Loading…
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Current Weather
Loading Current Weather....
Published: Monday, 9/9/2013

COMMENTARY

Mistakes have been made

Newspaper corrections we'd like to see

BY DANIEL NEMAN
BLADE FOOD EDITOR

Newspaper corrections we'd like to see:

A food story in a recent edition made several spelling mistakes. “Cappuccino” has two Ps and two Cs (three, if you count the first one). “Omelet” can be spelled “omelet” or “omelette,” but never “omellet.” And it should be “Parmesan” cheese, not “Parmerzan.” The newspaper regrets the erorrs.

  • Clairol Herbal Essence shampoo is not, in fact, an adequate substitution for real herbs. We regret the mistake.
  • A recent article about Tex-Mex cuisine included a recipe for a wood-fired chicken burrito with refried beans scented with toasted cumin and pickled Spanish onions, but honestly it would be easier just to go to Chipotle.
  • As you probably realized, the story about home-brewed beer last week was written by a reporter who had sampled too much of the product. The matter has been dealt with.
  • Last week’s recipe for Ancient Roman Stew Made With Authentic Ingredients was just a recipe for meat loaf written in Pig Latin. It was written by the same reporter who wrote about home-brewed beer. We reiterate: It has been dealt with.
  • On Sept. 3, we ran a recipe for Extra-Spicy Volcanic Chicken Wings. If you eat them, please seek immediate medical attention.
  • An article from the New York Times News Service that appeared to be a recipe for mustard and plums turned out to be a story about the board game Clue and its characters Colonel Mustard and Professor Plum. We vow to read these things more carefully in the future.
  • A recipe in last Tuesday’s food section was incorrect. Deviled eggs should be sprinkled with paprika, not chicken paprikas.
  • A story about cookbooks contained an error. Julia Child’s Favorite Recipes was not written by Craig Claiborne. It was written by Julia Child.
  • Tawny Port is not the name of a stripper.
  • Last week’s Food section contained a recipe for Grilled Squid in a Spicy Peanut Sauce. No one here knows how it got into the newspaper.
  • Last week’s recipe for blueberry pie should have called for one quart of blueberries, not Brussels sprouts. Sorry about that.
  • A story published last month about artichoke dip contained a recipe calling for “as much mayonnaise as you want.” The correct amount is two tablespoons.
  • For the sake of your health, the Aug. 27 recipe for Buttery Toffee Chocolate Cake with Caramel Mousse Filling and Mocha Whipped Cream Topping should be ignored in its entirety.
  • An article on the foods of the indigenous tribes of the Amazon Rain Forest included a recipe for Cannibal Stew. That was meant solely as a joke which, we now realize, was in poor taste. We regret the entire episode.
  • The ingredient “one pound pure, freshest-possible raw beef” was supposed to be in our recipe of Beef Tartare, not Delia’s Vegetarian Surprise.
  • The classic French dessert croquembouche consists of dozens of small, round puff pastries filled with pastry cream, coated in caramel and stacked into a cone which is then encircled with wisps of delicately crispy spun sugar. An article described it as “easy” and “you can make it in a snap.” Actually, the process is quite intricate and requires many hours of intense, protracted work. Why anyone would even attempt it is beyond us.
  • Contrary to a recent story, Cheetos are not considered an important ingredient in traditional Indian cooking.
  • The word “scones” was misspelled in the phrase “deliciously light and flaky stones.”
  • A recipe for Classic Apple Pie contained this sentence: “Sally — my wife is out of town this weekend, so meet me at my house at 8 p.m.” That part of the recipe was meant to be read by the copy editor only, and was not intended for publication. The writer sincerely, sincerely regrets the error, but he doubts it will help.

Contact Daniel Neman at 
dneman@theblade.com 
or 419-724-6155.



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.

Related stories