Who made Norquist the boss?


Who is Grover Norquist? A good number of Republican lawmakers have signed a pledge to him not to raise taxes. He now states he will support opponents of anyone backing off this pledge (“The Norquist train is derailing,” op-ed column, Dec. 1).

But these lawmakers are elected by us. They are our employees, our representatives. Why are they signing a pledge to anyone, let alone someone not in their constituency? Is this not a violation of the congressional oath? Is this not a form of minority rule by an unelected person?

Maybe our problems stem from the fact that Congress focuses wrongly on special interests, and our needs and expectations are inconsequential.

Perhaps we’re suffering from taxation with misrepresentation.




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Maumee’s fee for banners ripped

Colorful banners informing us of church concerts, business events, community theater performances, and charity functions are displayed in uptown Maumee, but City Council has decided to cash in on the public’s desire to be informed.

The city charges $50 for hanging the banners, even to charities, claiming that the promotional opportunity has been abused and city workers’ time in hanging and removing the banners should be compensated.

There are other ways around these concerns than grabbing money from organizations that can least afford it.



Editor’s note: A Maumee spokesman said the fee covers processing the application for a banner, hanging and taking down the banner, and making overtime calls to secure a loose or damaged banner after hours or on weekends.


GOP radical right? Not so fast

The media have gone out of their way in the past two presidential elections to paint the Republican presidential nominees as representing the radical right. That is wrong.

John McCain, the GOP’s 2008 nominee, is a Vietnam veteran and a former prisoner of war. Mitt Romney is a former Mormon missionary and has a master’s degree from Harvard University in business administration.

If these men are radicals, we need more of them.


309th Street


Toledo has too many managers

The City of Toledo should return to a city manager form of government (“Mayor Bell first must fix streets,” Readers’ Forum, Nov. 5). The city seems to be top-heavy with management personnel at One Government Center.

City residents should keep their eyes open to see where their tax money is going: to pay raises for managers and not workers.