Scott High School ushers in 100th with parade, pageantry

Homecoming court, past royalty share stage

10/19/2013
BY NOLAN ROSENKRANS
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Brittani Graves of the Class of 2017 is met by her escort, the Bulldog mascot, during the kickoff of Scott High’s centennial celebration in the school’s field house Friday.
Brittani Graves of the Class of 2017 is met by her escort, the Bulldog mascot, during the kickoff of Scott High’s centennial celebration in the school’s field house Friday.

Alexus Woodley and D’angelo Gaston got the biggest crowns at Scott High School, but it was hard to tell Friday if they were the biggest stars in the school’s field house.

Maybe it was Janet Quinn-Wyatt, the 1956 homecoming queen and first African-American to win that honor at Scott. She was first in a parade of past homecoming kings and queens honored at the school, as Scott celebrates past and present this week.

PHOTO GALLERY: Click here to see more photos from the celebration

But the biggest cheer came for Treva Jeffries, the school’s fiery-yet-ever-ready-to-hug, homegrown principal, homecoming queen in 1992. Yes, louder than for young Woodley and Gaston. Them’s the breaks when you’re crowned homecoming king and queen during a school’s “Year of the Bulldog.”

Not that the pair cared. In fact, sharing the moment with school royalty from years past made the day even more special.

“It means everything to me,” young Gaston said. The football team’s middle linebacker said that Scott alum, “inspired me to be king.”

“It makes it more of a privilege,” Miss Woodley said.

Scott students, alumni, and staff sing during the celebration. The event drew alumni from decades reaching back to the 1950s and attendees sang the school's alma mater.
Scott students, alumni, and staff sing during the celebration. The event drew alumni from decades reaching back to the 1950s and attendees sang the school's alma mater.

And for Ms. Quinn-Wyatt, it was simply awesome.

Scott, which opened in 1913 on Collingwood Boulevard, is in the midst of its centennial celebration, and this weekend’s homecoming celebration serves as a climax. There was the normal pomp and circumstance of a homecoming celebration Friday, but with extra sashes and tiaras.

The Fantastic Dancing Machines did their thing. The crowd sang the alma mater. Senior athletes were honored before the crowd of current and former students. And, of course, there were shouts of “Once a Bulldog, Always a Bulldog.”

Treva Jeffries, Scott's principal and 1992 homecoming queen, acknowledges the crowd while being escorted by Dameon Austin, the 1992 homecoming king.
Treva Jeffries, Scott's principal and 1992 homecoming queen, acknowledges the crowd while being escorted by Dameon Austin, the 1992 homecoming king.

But after the new king and queen were crowned, just as many gathered to take pictures of and congratulate royalty of the past. Homecoming kings and queens from every decade since the 1950s were represented.

Almost 20 events are set for Scott’s celebration throughout this year, and they continue this weekend. A parade starts at 10 a.m. today that will wind through the Old West End and Olde Towne neighborhoods. The football team plays at 3 p.m. at Start High School, 2100 Tremainsville Rd., against Woodward.

The Centennial Program, which includes a dinner and dance and requires a reservation, begins at 5:30 p.m. with a cocktail hour at the SeaGate Convention Centre, 401 Jefferson Ave.

The school building is a featured player in the celebration. A refurbished Scott High School reopened last year after a more than two-year, $42 million renovation. On Sunday, the school will hold an open house, with tours of the building between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

While this year may be for Bulldogs, next year will be for the Indians: Waite High School celebrates its own centennial in 2014.

Contact Nolan Rosenkrans at: nrosenkrans@theblade.com or 419-724-6086, or on Twitter @NolanRosenkrans.