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Friday, December 19, 2014
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Published: Monday, 4/30/2001

To keep working, avoid the Democrats

A recent contributor to this forum asked why workers supported President Bush. I think the question needs to be asked, “Why would anyone who works for a living vote for any Democrat?”' Democrats don't represent workers, they only represent the non-working, the phony Hollywood elite, and billionaire fugitives.

The biggest expenses most workers face are taxes, yet Democrats continually try to raise taxes and find new ways to waste taxpayer money. And when the President proposes to let workers keep more of their earnings, Democrats claim that it is too risky to allow people to have their own money; I hope voters in this region recall that Rep. Marcy Kaptur voted against tax relief.

Liberal Democrat policies against oil and gas exploration cause dependence on foreign fuel sources. Is it a coincidence that the last two presidents from the Democratic Party have left the country with a fuel crisis? Who pays the price for these failed liberal policies? People who work in manufacturing. When fuel prices rise and demand for vehicles drops, workers ultimately lose their jobs because Democrats are against domestic fuel production.

Even more puzzling is why the United Auto Workers would endorse a candidate (Al Gore, Jr.) who is hostile towards automobile manufacturers. Mr. Gore's distaste for autos surely would have resulted in more regulations that would cause job loss, yet the union happily supported this position.

If you want to keep working, make it a point to avoid Democrats.

MATT MENDEN

Westway Street

Those of you in Ohio who are considering a move to Michigan because of lower property taxes should do some research prior to any move.

For instance, say you live in Ohio and purchase a $30,000 automobile in Ohio. The dealer allows you $10,000 for your trade-in. The Ohio sales tax is then calculated on the $20,000, or $1,250.

Now, if you live in Michigan and you do the same deal with a Michigan automobile dealer, you pay the sales tax on the full $30,000 regardless of any trade-in. Even though Michigan has a lower tax, you end up paying 6 percent or $1,800.

This amounts to $550 more than if you made the purchase in Ohio.

No matter how you plan or where you live, you are going to pay the government dearly and get very little in return. Example: Drive around lower Michigan and compare the wagon trails there with your area roads.

PETER KERN

Ottawa Lake

With regard to the alleged botched kidnapping scheme, let us not forget the other innocent victim that suffered in the name of greed - Anthony Baldwin's dog - which was apparently killed to make the so-called kidnapping appear more believable.

It's only fair and just that the Toledo Humane Society file animal cruelty charges. An example should be made to demonstrate to society that this type of cruel and abhorrent behavior should not and will not be tolerated.

MARY J. MILLER

Heatherlawn Drive

While all of us anxiously await the decision by ODOT regarding the preferred alternative for U.S. 24 between Napoleon and I-475, Sverdrup Associates and ODOT should be commended for their thorough analysis of all the issues.

This is a highway project that must accommodate the ever increasing transportation needs of our region not only now, but 20 and 30 years from now as well.

With 125 percent increase in truck travel just since 1990, separating over-the-road traffic from commuter and school bus traffic should make sense to everyone.

While I am in support of lowering tolls or eliminating tolls completely from the Ohio turnpike, engineering reports show there was a 12 percent increase in truck traffic every year on U.S. 24 between 1990 and 1994 before the toll increases.

After the toll increase there has been a 13 percent increase per year. While some trucks may divert to the turnpike, we must remember the turnpike runs east and west. U.S. 24 runs northeast to southwest.

The 1997 origin and destination study by ODOT states “the turnpike does not appear to be the major reason truck volumes have increased on U.S. 24 between Fort Wayne and Toledo.”

While all of us have our opinions regarding this important transportation project, we must all work together when a final determination is made.

Sverdrup Associates and ODOT should be commended for the exhausting hours they have spent on their analysis and thorough review of the alternatives.

As a community we must work together to accomplish our needs. I will do just that!

JOE BECKLER

Waterville

Just when I thought it was safe to open the Sunday Blade again, there was yet another plea for leniency for Jack Kevorkian from Jack Lessenberry.

In the scant two years since the assisted-suicide advocate was rightly convicted of second-degree murder, Mr. Lessenberry has written several columns sympathetic to Kevorkian.

In one memorably ridiculous piece, he even suggested that Kevorkian is a “political prisoner” and a “martyr!”

What nonsense. The caustic, arrogant Kevorkian is hardly a sympathetic figure. He has only himself to blame for his current situation.

Mr. Lessenberry seems to think that Kevorkian's age, 72, warrants a reduction of his sentence. It shouldn't.

When Byron De La Beckwith, the racist murderer of civil-rights worker Medgar Evers, was finally convicted, he was older than Kevorkian is now. He served hard time until his death earlier this year.

Mr. Lessenberry has lost all objectivity when it comes to Kevorkian.

Someone at The Blade really should take him aside, put a friendly hand on his shoulder, and patiently explain to him that nobody gives a damn about the old crackpot anymore.

JON SARRA

Brunswick Drive

In any language, `wow' is still `wow'

I read with interest Chris Borrelli's April 22 article, “Skittish about subtitles.” He quoted Elliott Wilhelm of the Detroit Film Theater, who referred to “... three-hour Swedish movies.” I recalled something I hadn't thought of in a long while.

Years ago, when I lived in another community, a new theater, the “Art” opened. It was small, seating probably only several hundred. Although there was little publicity, the theater was usually packed, since word got around that being shown were what was then considered to be risqu foreign films.

My late husband, whose first language was Swedish, and I one evening went to the Art to see “Wild Strawberries,” which featured only Swedish subtitles, and no audible dialogue. Since I did not know that language, he began translating quietly for my benefit. We occupied seats in about the seventh row and soon those around us, mostly college students, began to ask my husband to interpret the printed dialogue a little louder. Soon others clustered around us and strained to hear what he said. For those who weren't near enough to participate, those who were relayed the information verbatim to patrons seated farther away.

This was a serious exercise. At one point, however, it became hilarious. After viewing a “risqu ” scene, which certainly needed no translation, my husband uttered one word, “WOW.” That one word was picked up and obediently relayed promptly to patrons throughout the theater. Later, I asked what the Swedish word for “WOW” is, and my husband replied, “ `WOW' is `WOW' in any language.' ”

MARJORIE FAGERSTROM

Perrysburg



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