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Published: Wednesday, 11/20/2002

Nice people eased pain of tornado

We would like to commend all of our neighbors, the emergency workers, and the residents of the area for helping us after the tornado hit our neighborhood Nov. 10. We live on Cedar Street and our house was struck by the tornado.

We recently moved to the area from Nevada. We have never seen such caring and nice people as those in this town in our entire lives. On Monday, a family from Marblehead asked if they could help clean up our yard, and they moved all the debris to the front yard so the front-end loaders could remove it. We didn't even get their names but we are grateful. My son's co-workers at Kroger have been very understanding and helpful. Our house was badly damaged and workers helped protect the house from further damage. It was wonderful to see everyone pitch in and help each other in our neighborhood during this time of crisis.

We thank God that no one was killed or seriously injured. After seeing the destruction we cannot imagine how everyone was spared.

We can repair our homes, replace our vehicles, and start over again, but it will be difficult to repay the kindness and compassion shown to us by our friends and neighbors.

DAVID, CINDY, and DEREK JOHNSON

Port Clinton

Congratulations to those who voted “yes” for the Sylvania School Levy. It shows that they have no desire to make the state keep its promise not to rely on property tax to support schools. It shows that they don't care a thing about seniors and others on limited incomes. It shows that they live in their own little wealthy world, where necessities are never threatened and material possessions and good times dominate. It shows that they have no conscience.

As they walk through their multi-thousand-dollar homes, they have caused others to give up their homes. As they go out to a costly restaurant or their club, they have caused others to give up a meal. As they pack for their next trip, they have caused others to skip a doctor's appointment or needed medication. May they never know what it is like to be in the other person's shoes.

SANDY FLICK

Rose Acres Drive

We found elements of this election season puzzling:

Like how people think that negative ads don't affect them. It appears they might. Especially when we don't have time to follow details. Take one of our associates who said he didn't vote for Sandy Isenberg because of a TV poem stating she “double-roofed.”

Regarding school issues, we're often left head-scratching. Although we support our libraries, parks, and zoo, it amazes us how they virtually get a free check. No questions, no debate. The schools, on the other hand, often have to plead while being held hostage by one interest group or another.

On Issue 2, whether it passes or not, the fact is that the schools will eventually have to be redone or rebuilt. Hopefully, we took advantage of the millions of dollars offered by Columbus. It seems to make more sense than paying the entire bill.

And then, there's that “mandate” reported for the Save Our Schools group because the Issue 2 vote was so close. Revisiting the building plan is fine, but a mandate? How many of the no-voters voted that way simply because they didn't want their taxes raised, regardless of the structures?

One frustrating question, asked repeatedly: “Why did the Toledo School system let its buildings get so run down?” Well, new or old, buildings cost money. Seems obvious that Toledo administrators tried to make do, going to voters as seldom as they could with the lowest millage possible, knowing people are not happy with more taxes.

Finally, while most citizens complain about financing schools through property taxes, were they careful who they voted into state positions? Some of the newly elected are the very ones who may ignore or overturn the unconstitutionality of financing schools through property taxes.

Quite the conundrum.

RON and PAT ZIELINSKI

Mapleway Drive

I lived at one of the more well-known downtown apartment buildings. I loved living downtown, but I will not move back until some things change.

First, my car was vandalized in a parking garage that I paid my landlord each month to use. The apartment complex refused to pay the damages. I decided to let it go.

Then I began to realize that the area was really not safe at all. There are several bars within the vicinity of my apartment complex, which brings a very rowdy crowd. This was never a concern because my apartment complex had police officers on duty all weekend until the wee hours of the morning.

Suddenly, that service ended. It seemed to end at about the same time my car was vandalized. But again, I decided to let it go and I would cut my losses and move to a safer place at the end of my lease.

Even after I moved I had problems. My security deposit was late. When I finally received it, I was given a check for $60, that is $475 less than the original deposit. I was charged for what added up to wear-and-tear. To make a long story short, I had to take my landlord to court. At the very last minute before seeing the judge, my landlord finally decided to settle outside of court. This happened even after several weeks of trying to get my landlord on the phone to resolve the issue without legal action. Basically, I was ignored. I was not treated as a tenant, but as revenue.

So the moral of the story is that downtown Toledo is on its way to being a great place to live. Now all they need to do is run better apartments that can guarantee the safety of residents and will not rip them off.

JAMES J. SIEGEL

106th Street

In response to the Nov. 5 letter about Bales Road, we have lived on Bales for 30 years and raised our family of four here. The residents of this road were tired of all the traffic cutting through from Douglas and to Douglas to miss the light at the triangle intersection.

Last summer we asked the city of Toledo for help. We were given a petition which over 70 percent of the residents signed. A monitor was then placed in the first block off Laskey Road. There were more than 1,500 vehicles, at an average of 35 miles an hour, passing through on a daily basis.

Don't blame the road crews. We got tired of the noise and our possessions rattling on the walls. The residents really appreciate the city helping us with the problems. It's very easy to drive slowly enough to pass over the bumps without damaging a vehicle. Maybe the earlier letter writer needs to find a new route to go to her parents' home.

BARBARA SMITH

Bales Road

So there is a big hoop-de-do over seven human remains of the Spafford family being held in Columbus in boxes for 18 months. How about a little concern for the human remains sitting on shelves at the Ohio Historical Society?

Could it be that because the remains happen to be Native American that there is no outcry? Where is the fairness? If white remains need to be reburied with proper words said over them, doesn't the same hold true for red remains? Isn't everyone entitled to have his or her spirit at peace? How many more decades will it take?

With the Ohio Historical Society under pressure from the Ohio Legislature to be more accountable, it is time to stop making people jump through hoops, get on with it, and do the right thing. Get everybody back into the ground and soon.

PAT GARVER

Gilbert Road

I feel sorry for immigrants who are trying to learn English.

The beautiful word “Autumn” has been swept under the rug and replaced by the word “fall,” which to me is associated with pain.

Since the majority of people prefer fall to Autumn, why not replace coil for Spring; heat for Summer, and freeze for Winter?

LOTTIE POZARZYCKI

Thelma Drive



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