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Published: Saturday, 2/27/2010

Cartoons say plenty about news

Blade Editor David Kushma was right in his Feb. 21 column "Stop them pictures? Not a chance" about editorial cartoons and the effect they can have in conveying messages about current events.

A number of years ago, I subscribed to a magazine named Conservative Digest. It published a cartoon that has stuck with me. It depicted a guy standing beside his car that had a flat tire; he was throwing dollar bills at the tire. The caption stated: "A Democrat's answer to a problem."

Although Democrats may find this a negative assessment of their financial acumen, this can now be broadened to include Republicans who have developed into Democrats-light.

It seems no matter who is in office, politicians all are trying to buy votes with goodies for the home folks.

James Bedee

Westbourne Road

The federal government has loaned Nissan Motor Co., a Japanese automaker, $1.4 billion to help build its new electric car and battery packs to power it at a factory in Tennessee ("Car buyers can sign up for Nissan's Leaf in April," Feb. 12).

Is that fair to the American people? After all, the profits go back to Japan or to other foreign carmakers. Do U.S. car buyers understand that?

Robert J. Forney

Bellevue, Ohio

Let's take advantage of the House committee that is investigating Toyota and follow up with an investigation of General Motors' 3.8-liter, V6 engine and its track record of failing plenums ("Toyota's president apologizes for recalls," Feb. 25).

Everyone I know who owned a GM vehicle with this engine has replaced this part at least once, and this is not an inexpensive repair. I replaced one in an Oldsmobile that we traded in, and the Oldsmobile we still own has had two such replacements.

If a trial lawyer initiated a class-action suit, I believe the number of vehicles that should have been recalled because of this design flaw would dwarf the number of Toyotas that have been recalled. The difference is that Toyota, albeit not as quickly as it should have, is conducting a recall.

GM, although it is aware of the problem, refuses to do so.

Duane Petri

Maumee

Where was the Rossford school board when property was sold for a gambling casino about one mile from their schools ("Casino firm pays $2.5M for property," Dec. 31)?

Casino visitors will not be thrilled to read that they are considered unsavory.

Moving the school community is as inane an idea as I have ever heard. If the casino is about a mile away, are children who live in that area walking a mile to school?

Today's children are either driven by parents, have cars of their own, or are bused. The days of kids walking a mile to school are long past.

Mildred Valare

Oakridge Drive

We have another chance to make the Marina District a busy business district by putting the new casino on the old Sports Arena property.

It will fit in with other business plans. This is the right place for the casino, because it is easy to reach from I-280 and I-75.

Andrew Feyes

Northwood

What amazes me about our country is the number of people who think so little of themselves that they believe government can solve their problems for them.

Alan Kinker

Cherrylawn Drive

When discussion of the economy and jobs situation comes up, look at the contribution of organized labor.

Organizing workers for protection from unjust labor practices or unsafe conditions in the workplace should have been the focus of unions. Using the power of the membership to obtain higher wages by striking is how unions helped the country get into the present condition.

In the 1970s, there often were news stories about companies striking for higher wages. The unions thought this was a just aim.

Our country still had the best technology and manufacturing base in the world, but shortsightedly, we did not see the sleeping giant in the Far East.

Once Asians obtained the tooling and know-how, they were manufacturing products on a par with ours, and in some cases better, with a work force that was paid much less than our workers.

All that was gained by driving up our wages were higher prices for products and inflation. In the end, everything cost more, and to compete, companies began to move overseas. We have destroyed our manufacturing base.

Back then, when I was making $5 an hour, I had the same purchasing power that I do now - maybe even more.

So what did we accomplish?

Lou Stefanoni

306th Street

The Davis-Besse nuclear power plant in Ottawa County is preparing for a refueling outage that will employ many people.

FirstEnergy Corp. has chosen to employ out-of-state people to supplement its in-house electrical staff at higher pay and per diem rates than local electricians are paid.

This seems like a slap in the face to Davis-Besse's customers and the local work force.

I have the privilege of being employed for the outage, but I have many friends who could use the income locally, so they don't have to lose their houses or file for bankruptcy to save some of what they worked for at previous outages.

Benjamin C. Mincheff

Oak Harbor, Ohio

Trees that are eight feet away from electrical wires are considered by Toledo Edison to be "incompatible trees and brush" and are cut down ("Family loses its battle to save 140 evergreens," Feb. 24).

The next time you drive on Secor Road, especially between Kenwood Boulevard and Bancroft Street, please notice all the tree limbs that are hanging or lying on the electrical lines. What does Toledo Edison call these?

Don't say they are in Ottawa Hills and that Edison doesn't come there. The utility is in my back yard at least once a year.

Christine Vischer

Ottawa Hills

Can you imagine all the snow, ice, and cold weather we would be having if it were not for global warming?

Thank goodness nothing was accomplished at the Copenhagen conference ("U.N.: Climate accord leaves 'a lot of work'; Agreement is viewed as flawed but essential step," Dec. 20).

Tony Esposito

Regina Parkway

Many Americans understand the position of Rep. John Boehner of Ohio, the House Republican leader, on health care ("Obama maps health-care overhaul plan," Feb. 23).

He can have the finest publicly funded health-care program that tax money can buy. He just does not want anyone else to have it.

Carol Hill

Palmetto Avenue



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