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Published: Sunday, 5/6/2012

Letters to the Editor

Postal crisis not only GOP’s fault

I agree with the main premise of your April 28 editorial "Postal crisis delayed" -- that one of the main reasons the U.S. Postal Service is in trouble is its requirement for prefunding of future retirement benefits. No other government agency, or any business, has such a burden.

However, I take issue with your statement: "Republicans in Congress largely manufactured the crisis with a 2006 law that requires the Postal Service to prefund 75 years of future retiree health benefits in just 10 years."

Although Republicans held a majority in Congress when the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act was passed in December, 2006, the bill was co-sponsored by several Democratic lawmakers.

In the House, the bill was passed by a voice vote, which included Democrats supporting it. In the Senate, the bill was passed by unanimous consent, which included Democrats supporting it.

Congress should not have passed the bill in 2006. All of Congress, not just one political party, should fix the prefunding issue.

George Sarantou

Sulgrave Drive

Editor's note: The writer is a Republican member of Toledo City Council.

Postal service offers quality

Critics who would end the Postal Service ignore the quality of its service, which is unmatched by for-profit competitors: first-rate personalized delivery to every address in town.

UPS and its cohorts aren't geared for that job. They work well for business deliveries, but flunk serving people who aren't home during business hours or are out of town.

Local post offices have local phone numbers in local directories that you may call about a delivery need. FedEx and UPS don't provide local numbers.

Recently, I stayed home all day for a UPS delivery. I saw online that an attempted delivery had failed. For security's sake, the back door is where I, my friends, handymen, and others come and go. A sign in big black letters on the front glass of the locked porch door says that whatever doesn't fit in the door mail slot is be delivered to the rear.

That's been no problem for the Postal Service, but it is a major one for private delivery services. Tradespeople often call en route. UPS can't?

I'm quitting catalog orders without a Postal Service option. I'd tell the Postmaster General that, but I can't find a mailing address for him online.

Eileen Foley

Lowe Road

Buffett Rule would be fair

The idea that the Buffet Rule represents fairness should not be trivialized, as conservative columnists such as Charles Krauthammer have done ("Buffett Rule is an exercise in misdirection," op-ed, April 15).

Fairness is fundamental to our democracy in that it instills trust and confidence. If Americans feel their government is not fair and equitable in its system of taxation, and that tax breaks go only to the wealthy, they are not likely to support calls for sacrifice to reduce the deficit.

A belief in the fundamental fairness of our government is what makes America exceptional.

Jim Wagner

Sylvania Township

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Politicians set bad bullying example

We adults claim to be concerned about bullying. Really? The leaders of our country are the champions of bullying. What example does that set?

Our children need only to watch the mean-spirited political ads in the media. With a little more than six months of political pummeling remaining, November can't come soon enough.

Sheryl Levin

Monclova Township

New airline won't help airport

A commercial carrier's new service to one destination twice a week from Toledo Express Airport will interest just about no one ("Toledo Express to get new flights to Myrtle Beach," April 27). It will not bring any more carriers to Toledo Express when one of the country's largest airports, Detroit Metro, is 45 minutes up the road.

This new service will not pay for a security detail, counter people, ground crews, car rental people, people in the control tower, or those who staff the fire engine.

I know the airlines don't pay for all of that, but a good part of that is included in their landing fees. I was a licensed instructor and airline and commercial pilot for more than 50 years.

The Blade should solicit ideas for a viable use for Toledo Express. Then we might get some good ideas from those without an agenda.

Charles Dersher

Sylvania

Fines not enough to stop animal cruelty

As a former assistant prosecutor in Fulton and Ottawa counties, I am well aware that Ohio animal cruelty laws are not sufficient to punish offenders and deter heinous acts against innocent animals ("‘Suitcase 6' defendant is granted a plea deal; Toledo man is allowed to keep other 2 dogs," April 24).

I am saddened that even with the limited punishment available to our courts, Howard Davis is simply going to receive what amounts to a small monetary fine.

Mr. Davis was ordered last month to pay $466 to the Toledo Area Humane Society in restitution for the care provided to the puppies he abandoned.

I have great respect for John Dinon, the humane society executive director. But I am disappointed in his comment: "This wasn't a guy beating a dog with a baseball bat."

When these puppies were zipped in a dark suitcase with limited air and without food or water, Mr. Davis intended them to die or didn't care whether they did.

We can't let people escape punishment for senseless crimes against innocent animals. We need to send a clear message that this behavior is unacceptable and will be punished. I find it hard to understand how a fine does that.

Christy Cole

Glencairn Avenue



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