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Published: Sunday, 6/17/2012

Letters to the Editor

Graduation screaming uncalled for

On June 6, my son graduated from Bowsher High School in a ceremony at Stranahan Theater. Even though all graduates were told to make sure their friends and family did not yell excessively, several people screamed and made it difficult to enjoy commencement.

The graduate whose name was read just before my son's had a lot of family and friends who screamed at the top of their lungs. They yelled for so long that it was hard to hear my son's name announced.

That was not fair to my son, who worked hard to maintain a 3.98 grade-point average and graduated with many awards.

Two people in the balcony brought air horns. When they were used, I looked up to the balcony and saw one security guard texting and another fanning herself with a program. Neither went over to investigate who used the air horns or asked them to leave.

When it is not dealt with, bad behavior continues. I don't understand why no action was taken.

It is impolite for people to scream and make fools of themselves at a high school graduation. I am upset that the obnoxious behavior was permitted.

Shelley Rockefeller

Toronto Avenue

Shouting sours Rogers graduation

In the past year, I have attended three commencements: Toledo Christian School, the University of Toledo, and Rogers High School.

I was disgusted by the rudeness of some of the families and friends at the Rogers commencement. Those people shouted and screamed even though the school's principal tried to quiet them. I was embarrassed for the folks who came to see their relatives or friends graduate.

It's not the school's fault. It's the fault of a few idiots who never learned the meaning of politeness and decorum at home.

Rich Hauenstein

South Holland-Sylvania Road

Let's hear it for snail mail

My mother is 95 years old. One of the best times of her day is when she sees the mail truck go by ("Help post offices, pay bills by check," Readers' Forum, June 2).

She is from the old school and does not have a computer. But she probably has 10 pen pals across the United States that she writes to weekly or monthly.

We can pay bills electronically, but I am on a computer at work and the last thing I want to do when I get home is go online. There are days or weeks when I do not check my email, but I open my snail mail.

How many people would be put out of work if all the post offices were to close? How many people would be adversely affected if mail delivery was cut to several days a week?

Snail mail is one of the last things we can count on.

Becky Bunn

Perrysburg

Pay-by-mail logic may be flawed

The letter writer indicated that paying bills online has contributed to the decrease in mail volume over the past several years, which eventually may lead to the downsizing of the Postal Service.

Following that logic, why not create even more jobs in the public sector? People could commit victimless crimes, such as petty theft, to stimulate job growth. A significant increase in crime would require more police officers and create more opportunities for employment in the criminal justice system.

Patrick Ghaster

Waterville

Computer's fine, but she backs post office

I appreciate that some people like the convenience of online banking and bill paying, but I am not one of them. I use my computer for many things, but I do not have or want an Internet connection.

Many people, young and old, are in this position, or they cannot afford Internet service.

I use the U.S. Postal Service often. I have four children and 12 grandchildren, so I send many cards for birthdays, anniversaries, graduations, confirmations, weddings, get-well wishes, and sympathy.

I still pay my bills by check, so there still will be companies to print checks. When one business fails, many others are affected.

Sharon Tipping

Ottawa Lake, Mich.

Post office criticism makes him angry

As a retired senior who needs the local post office, I get angry with people who advocate an end to the Postal Service ("There's a reason it's called snail mail," Readers' Forum, June 2).

The Postal Service is not a drain on the taxpayer because it gets no taxpayer funds. It is a nonprofit, semi-independent federal agency.

My wife and I still write letters and send cards for all occasions. I pay all my bills by mail. I do all my banking by going to the bank. I do my own taxes and I pay them by mail. I don't own a computer.

I depend on the Postal Service. I know it needs to change, and it will, but right now it needs help.

I guess the letter writer wants to see a few hundred thousand people lose their jobs. How many people have already lost their jobs because of computers?

James Markin

Sylvania Township

Save post offices by sending letters

If every adult citizen of the United States sent one letter a week to an elected official, it would go a long way toward preserving the Postal Service.

Stanley Theisen, Jr.

West Alexis Road

I recently joined the board of directors of the Family House emergency shelter, an impressive organization that brings a sense of home for the homeless and hope for those who have lost all hope. It provides immediate, safe, clean shelter to families in need.

The recently proposed city of Toledo budget cuts would inhibit Family House in serving those vulnerable families in their time of despair ("Shelters face fund shortages; 2nd federal program will not make up for cuts, officials say," June 6). Family House may be forced to turn away families that need its help most.

These unfortunate families have no political clout or social status to influence decisions by political leaders. We as the community must be their voice. I hope people urge city officials to reconsider budget cuts that will hurt the most vulnerable in our community.

David Seeger

Sylvania

New board member sees Family House need

I recently joined the board of directors of the Family House emergency shelter, an impressive organization that brings a sense of home for the homeless and hope for those who have lost all hope. It provides immediate, safe, clean shelter to families in need.

The recently proposed city of Toledo budget cuts would inhibit Family House in serving those vulnerable families in their time of despair ("Shelters face fund shortages; 2nd federal program will not make up for cuts, officials say," June 6). Family House may be forced to turn away families that need its help most.

These unfortunate families have no political clout or social status to influence decisions by political leaders. We as the community must be their voice. I hope people urge city officials to reconsider budget cuts that will hurt the most vulnerable in our community.

David Seeger

Sylvania



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