Bailouts like candy for kids


The Blade’s willingness to condone spending $10 billion of taxpayers’ money because it is good for us and is the equivalent of a “$30 oil change” for the government is another reason our economy stands on the precipice of disaster (“RIP, Government Motors,” editorial, Dec. 2).

You assume that Ford Motor Co. would have been wiped out if General Motors and Chrysler had to reorganize on their own versus going bankrupt. That shows little faith in the ability of companies and unions to adjust to the world market and succeed, without politicians adding to the $17 trillion national debt that our grandchildren are going to have to pay for.

This was another exercise in corporate parenting by politicians and the media, where the children were given another candy bar to shut them up instead of the medicine of financial self-discipline that they really need.




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GM bailout loss adds to our debt

Although it may have been necessary to lend General Motors $49.5 billion, the sale of stock should have been at prices that resulted in at least the return of that money (“U.S. takes $10.5B loss with sale of GM shares,” Dec. 10).

This was just one of many giveaways of taxpayers’ money by federal politicians. A taxpayers’ revolt might be necessary, because politicians on both sides of the aisle treat our tax money as if it were their slush fund.


Beechway Boulevard


GM profitable, so why the loss?

GM made more than $20 billion since the bailout, but taxpayers are stuck with a loss of $10.5 billion. What’s wrong with this picture?


Monclova Township


GM should write a $10.5B check

It seems GM got a sweetheart deal, because stockholders lost their investment in 2009 and now taxpayers face a $10.5 billion loss.

The honorable thing for GM to do would be to send the U.S. government a check for $10.5 billion to cover the loss.

I have owned several GM vehicles. But I never will purchase one again, based on the way it does business.


Monclova Township


Here’s a new take on fund-raising

High school students often come to my door asking for a donation for school activities. Yet when leaves need to be raked or snow needs to be shoveled, these students are nowhere to be seen.

Why don’t they offer to do household chores for people at fund-raising times? Everyone would benefit, making the donation a lot more meaningful to both parties.


Sylvania Township