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Thursday, May 28, 2015
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Published: Wednesday, 8/6/2014 - Updated: 9 months ago

City Council in search of backup water supply

BY MATT THOMPSON
BLADE STAFF WRITER

Perrysburg City Council decided to move forward Tuesday with attempts to secure a backup water supply for an emergency connection if and when the city of Toledo‘‍s water isn’‍t available.

The council voted 6-1 to apply for a grant from the Ohio Department of Development for money to study the most feasible way to construct an emergency water connection between the city of Bowling Green Water System and Toledo‘‍s water system, which serves consumers of the Northwestern Water and Sewer District and Perrysburg residents. The study will cost about $85,000, $10,000 of which will be paid by the city of Perrysburg.

Alice Godsey, director of public utilities for Perrysburg, said the Northwestern Water and Sewer District and city of Bowling Green will each pay $10,000 too. The additional funds would come through the grant.

“We have no backup right now, which we were all painfully aware of,” Councilman Tim McCarthy said.

Toledo issued a do-not-drink warning after algae boom over the weekend. Bowling Green, which gets its water from the Maumee River, could have provided residents access to clean water if Perrysburg had a connection to that system. 

Todd Grayson was the only council member voting against the grant application. He was in support of the plan, but opposes using grant funds.

The council also passed a reduction in the street tree assessment for next year. The assessment now collects $100,000. The city will instead collect just $50,000 for next year. The tax last year cost the homeowner of a $100,000 house about $6. The reduced assessment would cost the same homeowner about $2.50 a year.

Again, Mr. Grayson was the only council member to vote against it. He said he believes the city should eliminate the assessment entirely and pay for the tree program with money from the general fund.

Mayor Mike Olmstead said the funding for the street tree maintenance and planting will remain the same as this year, but half the budget will come from the city‘‍s general fund.

There was almost an hour of public debate regarding the minimum staffing levels for the fire department. The department now requires a minimum of four firefighters per shift, but some residents and officials want to return the minimum to five firefighters per shift. Other public comments were about the new downtown Perrysburg renovation plan, and water concerns.

Contact Matt Thompson at: mthompson@theblade.com, 419-356-8786, or on Twitter at @mthompson25.


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