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Published: 1/29/2004

Police Lt. Rick Reed retires after 31 years

BY CHRISTINA HALL
BLADE STAFF WRITER
 You see a lot of pain and misery. You also see an awful lot of good work,  says Lt. Rick Reed, 53, who is retiring after having served decades with the Toledo Police Department. You see a lot of pain and misery. You also see an awful lot of good work, says Lt. Rick Reed, 53, who is retiring after having served decades with the Toledo Police Department.
SIMMONS / BLADE Enlarge

Toledo police Lt. Rick Reed emptied his locker at headquarters downtown and found relics of a bygone era - pictures of officers playing cards, a sweater, and a flashlight.

He stuffed the items into a box, one of the things the 53-year-old will take with him when he retires today after more than 31 years as a cop.

For years, he s held a high-profile post overseeing detectives who investigate homicides, robberies, and assaults, and doing media interviews. He will be replaced by Lt. Bill Moton, who oversees property crimes investigators.

“It s a very interesting job. You see a lot of pain and misery. You also see an awful lot of good work,” said Lieutenant Reed, who was assigned to the detective bureau in 1995.

A lot of that work comes from his colleagues, who describe him as tough but fair.

“He s a very good leader. If you had questions, he was helpful. He d guide you in the right direction,” Detective Vicki Stevens said.

Detective Mike Riddle agreed: “He had good work ethic and good work ability.”

Sgt. Bob Maxwell said his boss has a good sense of humor and isn t above pulling a joke or having one pulled on him.

Lieutenant Reed, who was a trustee with the command officers union, joined the force in 1972. He was promoted to sergeant 12 years later. In 1991, he became a lieutenant. After today, he ll work on his golf game, fish, and spend time with his wife, sons, and grandsons.

The Ohio State University fan said the worst part of the job is seeing the senselessness of crimes. The tough cases include those involving the elderly and children. A few unsolved cases still bother him.

But the job has highlights, such as solving cases. The best part of the job, he said, is the people with whom he works.



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