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Politics

Perrysburg school board seeks complex levy

Requests for funding also on ballots in Anthony Wayne, Ottawa Hills districts

  • perrysburg-school-levy-2

    Woodland Elementary School kindergarden teacher Olivia Zuchowski, right, leaves a pamphlet of information on the proposed school levy Saturday morning while canvasing with two other teachers in Perrysburg. Several volunteers were on hand to knock on doors and ask residents whether or not they planned on supporting the school levy in the upcoming November election.

    <THE BLADE/KATIE RAUSCH
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  • caron-perrysburg

    Phil Caron stands near his front yard sign in opposition to the Perrysburg school levy.

    <The Blade/Amy E. Voigt
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  • NBRS-pburgelect23

    Woodland Elementary School kindergarten teacher Olivia Zuchowski, right, leaves a pamphlet of information on the proposed school levy while canvassing in Perrysburg recently with fellow teachers Monica Roessler, left, and Mandy Craig.

    <THE BLADE
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  • NBRS-antilevy30p-2

    Phil Caron stands near his front yard sign in opposition to the Perrysburg school levy request that will appear on Tuesday's ballot. If approved, the four-year tax would generate $10 million in its first year, the district estimates.

    <The Blade/Amy E. Voigt
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perrysburg-school-levy-2

Woodland Elementary School kindergarden teacher Olivia Zuchowski, right, leaves a pamphlet of information on the proposed school levy Saturday morning while canvasing with two other teachers in Perrysburg. Several volunteers were on hand to knock on doors and ask residents whether or not they planned on supporting the school levy in the upcoming November election.

THE BLADE/KATIE RAUSCH
Enlarge | Buy This Image

EDITOR'S NOTE: This version corrects the year for Anthony Wayne's last bond issue.

Among area suburban schools with levies on this week's ballot, the Perrysburg Exempted Village School District has the most complex request.

Voters are being asked to approve an estimated 13.15 mills that would generate $10 million in the first year. The tax would increase to an estimated 14.4 mills in the second year, 15.7 mills in the third year, and 17 mills in the fourth and final year.

Under the current 9.95-mill levy, set to expire at the end of 2012, the owner of a $200,000 home pays about $609 a year. The current levy generates about $7.5 million for the district, representing about 20 percent of the district's budget, according to district Treasurer Matt Feasel.

If the new levy passes, the owner of a home valued at $200,000 would pay about $204 more the first year, then about $72 more a year the next three years.

READ MORE: The Blade 2012 Voters Guide

If it fails, Superintendent Thomas Hosler proposed a contingency plan to the school board that would mitigate a projected loss of $3.9 million for the 2012-2013 school year and $2.8 million for the 2013-2014 year, along with spending $1.1 million from the district's cash reserves.

The plan calls for nearly 96 positions in administration, teaching, and support to be eliminated, as well as cuts in transportation and building operations. School courses such as music, art, foreign language, and physical education would be reduced, as would support for athletics and other extracurricular activities.

In 2008, Perrysburg voters approved a 7.3-mill incremental levy that was collected at 7.3 mills in 2009, at 7.8 mills in 2010, and increased to 8.43 mills in 2011 and 9.95 mills in 2012.

caron-perrysburg

Phil Caron stands near his front yard sign in opposition to the Perrysburg school levy.

The Blade/Amy E. Voigt
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Mr. Hosler has said that a reduction in state funding is part of the reason the district is requesting an increased amount from voters, which is echoed by other districts with levies on the ballot.

Voters in the Anthony Wayne Local School District are being asked to renew an emergency levy that was first passed in 2003 and renewed in 2008.

The estimated 3.4 mills would generate about $3 million annually for the district's emergency fund over 10 years. 

The owner of a home valued at $100,000 would continue to pay about $104 a year, according to the Lucas County Auditor's Office.

The Anthony Wayne district includes Whitehouse, Waterville, Monclova Township, and portions of Fulton and Wood counties. Voters passed a bond issue for buildings in 2000.

The Ottawa Hills Local School District has a 2-mill permanent improvement replacement levy on the ballot that would span a continuing period. It would replace a 1.5-mill levy that expires at the end of this year with a half-mill increase.

The owner of a home valued at $200,000 currently pays about $92 a year and would pay about $122.50 a year if the levy passes, according to the Lucas County Auditor's Office.

Voters approved a 7.6-mill operating levy in 2010 and a 0.5-mill increase in 2011.

Contact Rebecca Conklin at: rconklin@theblade.com or 419-356-8786.

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