Loading…
Thursday, August 28, 2014
Current Weather
Loading Current Weather....
Published: Thursday, 5/8/2014 - Updated: 3 months ago

Snapchat settles FTC charges saying it deceived customers, misrepresented 'disappearing' snaps

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Snapchat has agreed to settle with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that it deceived customers about the disappearing nature of messages they send through its service and collected users’ contacts without telling them or asking for permission. Snapchat has agreed to settle with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that it deceived customers about the disappearing nature of messages they send through its service and collected users’ contacts without telling them or asking for permission.
ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge

NEW YORK — Snapchat has agreed to settle with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that it deceived customers about the disappearing nature of messages sent through its service and collected users’ contacts without telling them or asking permission.

Snapchat is a popular mobile messaging app that lets people send photos, videos and messages that disappear in a few seconds. But the FTC says Snapchat misled users about its data collection methods and failed to tell users that others could save their messages without their knowledge.

Snapchat has said that it notifies users when a recipient takes a screenshot of a “snap” they’ve sent. But the FTC said recipients with an Apple device that runs an operating system that predates iOS 7 could evade the app’s screenshot detection. Apple’s iOS7 launched last summer.

In addition, the FTC says Snapchat’s app stored video snaps that were not encrypted on the recipient’s device. The videos remained accessible to the recipient, the agency said. A user could access a video message, even after it supposedly disappeared, if the user simply connected the phone to a computer and accessed the video in the device’s file directory.

The FTC complaint also alleges that Snapchat failed to secure its “find friends” feature. A security breach in January allowed hackers to collect the usernames and phone numbers of some 4.6 million Snapchat users. The breach occurred after security experts warned the company at least twice about a vulnerability in its system. Snapchat later issued an update to its app that fixed the issue and allowed users to opt out of the “find friends” feature.

The settlement doesn’t have a financial component, but if Snapchat is found to violate the agreement, the company could end up paying a civil penalty of up to $16,000 for each violation. The Los Angeles startup reportedly turned down a $3 billion buyout offer from Facebook last fall.

The FTC said Snapchat agreed to settle without admitting or denying any wrongdoing.



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.

Related stories