Loading…
Thursday, August 28, 2014
Current Weather
Loading Current Weather....
HomeHome
Published: Wednesday, 11/2/2005

Oregon: Subdivision draws its critics

BY ERIKA RAY
BLADE STAFF WRITER

Some Oregon residents say a proposed subdivision would destroy farmland that should be preserved.

About a dozen residents attended a recent Oregon Planning Commission meeting to speak against the subdivision plan, which allows for 125 homes to be located on the corner of Wynn Road and Starr Avenue.

Mary Johnson-Ramirez, 63, of 5360 Starr Ave., said she is worried her home would lose value and she doesn't want to lose the open space of the farmland.

"We moved out into the country, and we want to stay in the country," she said.

The subdivision would be on 65 acres of land east of Wynn and north of Starr across the street from Pearson Metropark and west of the William P. Coontz Complex behind Oregon's police department and city hall.

To build the subdivision, proposed by The Moses-Schlachter Group of Sylvania Township, the zoning would have to be changed to an R-2 residential zone, allowing for more homes than the current classification.

Mike Rudey, Oregon's zoning inspector, said the homes are slated to be between 1,250 and 2,150 square feet and would be in the $175,000 to $200,000 price range.

The planning commission voted 3-2 to recommend to council that the zoning change be approved. Members Rick Orovitz and Joe Gajdostik voted against the recommendation.

Oregon City Council has scheduled a public hearing on the issue for Nov. 28 at 8 p.m. and could vote on the proposal.

Along with the subdivision, an indoor soccer complex has been proposed on the 10 acres of land closest to the corner of Starr and Wynn. Mr. Rudey said the facility is only in the pre-planning phase..

"It's a prime location for that because you would have the park across the street and a recreation facility behind that," Mr. Rudey said.

But residents said they don't approve of either plan, including Paul Soltesz, 38, of 420 South Stadium Rd., whose sister lives near the proposed subdivision and whose mother owns adjacent farmland.

He said he was concerned with drainage, preserving farmland, and said he didn't understand the logic of constructing a commercial building on land zoned for homes.

"I just seems to be a terrible place to do it," said Mr. Soltesz, who lives less than a mile from the proposed subdivision. "I'd rather see it farmed. Not everybody is for development and subdivisions."

But residents said they don't approve of either plan, including Paul Soltesz, 38, of 420 South Stadium Rd., whose sister lives near the proposed subdivision and whose mother owns adjacent farmland.

He said he was concerned about drainage, preserving farmland, and said he didn't understand the logic of constructing a commercial building on land zoned for homes. "It just seems to be a terrible place to do it," said Mr. Soltesz, who lives less than a mile from the proposed subdivision. "I'd rather see it farmed. Not everybody is for development and subdivisions."



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.






Poll