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Published: 7/29/2013

Northwood seeks bids for relief to flooding

Detention pond to be built nearby

BY CARL RYAN
BLADE STAFF WRITER
A detention pond to remedy flooding issues is planned for Greenway Estates subdivision. A detention pond to remedy flooding issues is planned for Greenway Estates subdivision.
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Northwood’s Greenway Estates subdivision residents may get some relief from the flooding that hits their area during heavy rains.

City council last week authorized soliciting bids for a detention pond to provide better drainage for rainwater runoff. The pond would be on an empty five-acre site east of the neighborhood, property the city purchased a few years ago for that purpose.

Northwood Administrator Bob Anderson said he expected the cost to be in the $300,000 range. Council also approved paying for the project with the city’s storm water management fund rather than assessing homeowners.

The vote was 5-0, with council members Randy Kozina and Dean Edwards abstaining because they live in the subdivision.

This is the third time the detention pond project has been put out to bid. Both times previously council allowed the bids to expire because it could not agree on financing.

Greenway Estates was developed in the 1970s, and the infrastructure was not built to current standards, Mr. Anderson said.

“If it were built today, the detention pond would be a requirement,” he said.

Heavy rains cause flooding in streets and basements. Mr. Kozina said drainage also was impaired by clogged ditches and streams in Ottawa County that conduct water to Lake Erie.

In other business, council voted not to renew the contract with Redflex Traffic Systems Inc., the owner of the city’s two speed and red light enforcement cameras. But the move will not mean a change because the cameras have not been operating for months.

The Redflex contract expired April 23, and the issue of renewal had been tabled until a full contingent of council members was present to vote.

Council was divided on the desirability of the cameras at the high-traffic intersections of Woodville and Lemoyne roads and Wales and Oregon roads.

Supporters maintained the cameras improved public safety, while detractors said they hurt businesses on Woodville.

Jim Barton, Mr. Kozina, Ed Schimmel, and Mr. Edwards voted against the renewal. Voting for it were Connie Hughes, Dave Gallaher, and Mike Myers.

The cameras generated $161,452 in fees for Northwood in 2012 and about the same amount in 2011. The city has collected more than $1 million since the cameras went into service in 2005. The money has been spent for public safety purposes such as radio equipment and school crossing lights.

Mr. Anderson said Redflex would be notified and the cameras and signs removed.



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