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Published: Tuesday, 5/27/2014 - Updated: 1 month ago

Five things you might have missed: 5-27

Top articles from this weekend's editions of The Blade

BLADE STAFF
The University of Toledo Medical Center began as the Medical College of Ohio Hospital. Construction began in 1975, and the hospital opened in 1979. The University of Toledo Medical Center began as the Medical College of Ohio Hospital. Construction began in 1975, and the hospital opened in 1979.
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1. Toledo’s medical college reaches golden milestone

A half century ago, an idea took root in Toledo that would flourish into the medical and educational foundation of the city — the Medical College of Ohio.

The college’s creation in 1964 marked a new era, though only those with vision could have grasped the possibilities and future impact.

Fifty years later, the potential recognized by the school’s earliest champions is evident at the sprawling South Toledo campus. Buildings now stand where only cornstalks and plans once grew, and more than 4,000 applicants a year now seek a spot in a medical school class of 175 students.

This year marks the golden anniversary for the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo, which became the University of Toledo college of medicine and life sciences after a 2006 merger with UT.  READ MORE

 

2. Regional CEOs get their pay but salary is just a piece of the total compensation package

For the CEOs of most large companies, base salary is only a small portion of their total compensation for the year. The big money — relatively speaking — typically comes through bonuses and stock awards, some of which are tied to future performance or may not be redeemable for years.

Imperfect as they are, the packages reported to the SEC are the standard gauge of how top executives are paid for their duties.

The Blade reviewed SEC filings for 15 publicly traded companies in the Toledo area to compile compensation data for their CEOs and other senior executives. READ MORE

 

Marines Cpl. Kenneth Arp, left, Sgt. Marshall Grayson, center, and PFC. Austin Adams, right, carry the flag-covered casket of Cpl. Harold W. Reed to his final resting place. Marines Cpl. Kenneth Arp, left, Sgt. Marshall Grayson, center, and PFC. Austin Adams, right, carry the flag-covered casket of Cpl. Harold W. Reed to his final resting place.
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3. Veteran’s remains from Korean War return for burial

As a decorative cap was lowered atop Marine Cpl. Harold W. Reed’s coffin, already in his grave at Ottawa Hills Memorial Park, brother-in-law Billy Power was satisfied.

“Nobody will ever see that again. He’s finally at rest,” Mr. Power said, as the cap, depicting a large American flag alongside Corporal Reed’s picture and his dates of birth and death, disappeared from view early Saturday afternoon.

More than 100 people, many of them veterans who snapped to attention and saluted, watched as a team of six Marines carried the coffin from a hearse to the gravesite at the start of a nearly hourlong burial ceremony at the West Toledo cemetery.

That procession completed a homecoming journey that began Nov. 29, 1950, when Corporal Reed was killed in action near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea two days shy of his 24th birthday. His body, buried on the battlefield, was later retrieved and taken to Hawaii, where its lack of identification resulted in a 63-year interment in a military cemetery until it was exhumed and flown to Detroit last week. READ MORE

 

World War II veteran and Jeep retiree Lupe Flores, right, looks at the restored Jeep. Behind him is Ron Szymanski, and Bob Kiss, one of the painters on the project. World War II veteran and Jeep retiree Lupe Flores, right, looks at the restored Jeep. Behind him is Ron Szymanski, and Bob Kiss, one of the painters on the project.
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4. Restored World War II 1942 Willys MB marks holiday

Chrysler employees dedicated a new veterans’ memorial outside Toledo’s Jeep plant on Friday featuring a restored military vehicle that was built in the city more than 70 years ago.

Chuck Padden, the plant manager of Chrysler’s Toledo Assembly Complex, said the company had been looking for a way to honor men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces over the years. They decided on building a display around an old, Toledo-built military Jeep.

“We thought we could tie the Jeep history and tie the Jeep legacy into honoring the veterans because they are so intertwined,” Mr. Padden said.

As war spread across Europe and Asia, the U.S. military decided it needed a versatile, all-purpose vehicle.

Ultimately, Willys-Overland was granted the contract to build the vehicle, designated the Willys MB. Troops soon just called them “jeeps” and the name stuck. Willys-Overland copyrighted the Jeep name in 1946. READ MORE

 

5. NASA’s advice aimed toward area businesses

Sixteen Ohio and Michigan companies have been chosen to receive help from scientists and engineers from NASA in connection with an upcoming “roadshow” that the federal space agency will hold on June 12 at the University of Toledo.

The list includes an auto parts supplier, agri-businesses, a biotech firm, and a solar industry firm. But also chosen was a firm that makes hip clothing for young adults, a firm that makes food-cooking equipment, and a 4-year-old Toledo firm that makes packaging for relief supplies earmarked to be dropped over disaster zones.

“I looked at each one of these proposals and sometimes I’m scratching my head. But [NASA] engineers looked at them and decided there’s something they can do to help each of them with their processes,” said Keith Burwell, president of the Toledo Community Foundation, one of nine agencies and organizations staging the NASA Roadshow. READ MORE

 

OUR TOWNS

Robert DiSalle, St. John's, shoots at Zach Mercer, of Southview, during water polo practice at Northview High School pool. Robert DiSalle, St. John's, shoots at Zach Mercer, of Southview, during water polo practice at Northview High School pool.
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Nothing boring for Sylvania water polo team

Let’s play a game of name that sport.

This sport includes penalty shots, dribbling the ball, fast passes, and slamming the ball into the goal box. It’s main season is in the fall.

No, it’s not soccer or hockey.

It’s water polo.

The Sylvania Water Polo team is a private group of high school athletes who practice in Northview High School’s pool. Comprised of 18 members, girls and boys, the team has players from Northview, Southview, St. John‘s Jesuit, and Notre Dame Academy.

On Wednesday nights, members meet for the spring season class, which began in April and lasts two months.

Coach Pete Dankert explained that the water sport season has been extended so athletes can stay in the game during off season. READ MORE

 



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