Deen’s fall has a wide ripple effect


The political correctness police are at it again. This time, the persecution is directed at Paula Deen for using the n-word years ago (“Deen’s slurs a bitter pill to swallow,” op-ed column, July 1). That word is no worse than other words that disrespect racial, ethnic, or religious groups.

If the only person punished was Ms. Deen, it wouldn’t matter. No doubt she has enough money to live comfortably without her empire. But it also affects the people who work for her, processing plant workers who make and package her products, sales and delivery workers, and many more.

None of these people, including people of color, has done anything wrong. They are victims of the P.C. police and the attendant media frenzy and corporate fear.

Many people will lose their jobs, their health insurance, and their hope for the future, all because someone used a bad word. Is it worth it? I don’t think so.


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Pro-life advocates need broader scope
People who say they are pro-life are really pro-fetus, because they wish to use the power of the state to force females to carry a fetus to term (“Abortion law: Both sides of debate find Ohio decision to be historic; New budget puts restriction on access,” July 8).

The “pro-life” position is not consistent when it fails to use the power of the state to support child care, health care, food stamps, and public housing. Children cost a great deal of money. Many young mothers do not have the money to support themselves and a child.

Pro-life people believe life is taken by birth control and abortion. They also believe they should not have any financial responsibility for children. That is not a logical conclusion; it is gross hypocrisy.



ProMedica growth adds to health cost
Everyone decries health-care costs in this country, but there is nothing in place to check the growth of hospitals (“ProMedica to redevelop Starlite Plaza; Medical facility planned for 44-year-old shopping center,” June 18). ProMedica already seems to own much of west Toledo; now it is buying a shopping center in Sylvania.

I lived in the Cleveland metropolitan area for 18 years. When I visit there now, Cleveland Clinic facilities seem to be everywhere.

Advertisements for doctors, prescription medications, and hospitals adds to the cost of health care. I use the mute button or change channels when these ads come on. I find them offensive.



Health-care costs needlessly high
“Nonprofit” health-care provider ProMedica is purchasing Starlite Plaza. Glad to see that it’s not hurting financially.

My wife recently had a relatively simple outpatient surgery at Toledo Hospital that cost $20,000. It’s no wonder that the United States is ranked as having the most expensive health-care system in the world.

The care that we receive is excellent, but where do we start to be able to make it affordable?