Couples must plan to be parents (Copy)


Now that Ohio has enacted new, restrictive abortion laws, we can expect to see more children born into poor, under-educated, fatherless homes (“Ohio gubernatorial politics: Challenger sets up fight on abortion,” July 12). How does that benefit our state?

Will the General Assembly and Gov. John Kasich propose new social programs to help care for and raise these children in a healthy environment? Or will they realize that abortion is just a symptom of the real problem: too many unplanned and unwanted pregnancies?

Our state government, Ohio Right to Life, Planned Parenthood, the University of Toledo, and other interested groups should join forces to develop programs to prevent unwanted pregnancies, so that abortion doesn’t have to be considered as an option.

This means promoting abstinence and birth control. It means educating girls not to become pregnant and boys not to make anyone pregnant until they are out of school, working, and married. Once, this was the norm in our society.

It means emphasizing that having and keeping a baby when you are young, poor, and unmarried practically guarantees perpetuating a cycle of poverty and dependence that is not good for anyone.

Sylvania Township


SUBMIT a Letter to the Editor

Conception has responsibilities
In response to the July 19 Readers’ Forum letter “Who pays for developing child?”: The answer is, the individuals who conceived the child.

Other members of society and its institutions are required to support those parents for the welfare of their children. Those who don’t wish to pay the cost of raising and supporting children to responsible adulthood should avoid conceiving them.

It’s not the responsibility of society to prevent pregnancy or to eliminate unwanted pregnancies. There are inexpensive ways to accept that personal responsibility.

Springfield Township


Mail service source of dismay
I am dismayed by the processing of Toledo mail at a facility outside Detroit (“Pickup times at mailboxes getting earlier,” July 3).

On July 27, I received three pieces of mail. All three were mailed on July 11 and had a Pontiac, Mich., cancellation stamp dated July 12. One was a bill that was due on July 31.

Someone could have walked this mail to Toledo much faster. This system and service are not acceptable.

I support the U.S. Postal Service, but the Toledo area does not deserve to be treated in such a shabby way.

Woodley Road


Immigration cartoon insulting
The July 8 editorial cartoon was an insult to your readers’ intelligence. Apparently, cartoonist David Horsey doesn’t get it.

House Republicans and others are trying to figure out a way to deal with the millions of illegal Latinos who live in this country. They are also trying to figure out a path to citizenship for the illegals that is cost-effective.

Making a joke out of this sensitive issue is irresponsible. Some Democrats favor an immigration bill only to secure the Latino vote. The rest of the politicians want fairness.

Imagine that someone breaks into your home, and that the law decides the intruder can be allowed to stay in your home, and you must foot the bill for the intruder’s every need. That is what some politicians in Washington are proposing. They don’t get it.

Springfield Township


Questions abound over IRS scandal
As the facts in the Internal Revenue Service scandal unfold, I hope we will learn the truth about the motivation, source, and depth of the agency’s egregious abuse of power (“House seeks to punish IRS with $3B budget cut,” July 10).

It stretches credulity that the IRS, acting alone, would target groups and individuals, based solely on their religious or conservative political beliefs, for scrutiny prior to the 2010 and 2012 elections.

As the investigation progresses, it will be interesting to see whether anyone in the Obama Administration, directly or indirectly, used the power of the IRS to intimidate and harass conservative organizations such as the Tea Party, and individuals whom they saw as political and ideological enemies.