5 things you might have missed: 10-28

Top stories from The Blade this past weekend

10/28/2013
BLADE STAFF
Jenny Kulish performs a mammogram for breast cancer survivor Margery Doncouse, right, in the Breast Care Center at Toledo Hospital in the Harris McIntosh Tower.
Jenny Kulish performs a mammogram for breast cancer survivor Margery Doncouse, right, in the Breast Care Center at Toledo Hospital in the Harris McIntosh Tower.

1. On the Job: Technologist eases patient fears as she performs imaging exams

Before she knocks on the door to an exam room, Jenny Kulish puts on her best happy face.

It’s not for her, but for the person waiting inside. The Breast Care Center at Toledo Hospital can be a scary place for patients. It’s where mammograms, biopsies, and breast cancer diagnoses take place. It’s also where patients find out that not all lumps are cancerous and not all cancers are life-ending.

But until they see Mrs. Kulish, or one of the other radiology technologists in the office, fear of the unknown wells up and takes over. READ MORE

 

Tessa, a 6-year-old German shorthaired pointer, searches for the scent of a homing pigeon placed by her owner Tom Davis during a training session.
Tessa, a 6-year-old German shorthaired pointer, searches for the scent of a homing pigeon placed by her owner Tom Davis during a training session.

2. TOLEDO MAGAZINE OUTDOORS: Portrait of a pointer

In the bird dog world, the debate can rage endlessly about which breed is superior in all of the traits that make a dog very effective in the field, whether it is competing for trophies in structured trials or on solitary hunts for pheasants, quail, or grouse with its owner.

A number of breeds perform very well, but for Tom Davis, a retired teacher who started his career at Toledo’s Bowsher High School in 1968, German shorthaired pointers are his bird dog of choice. READ MORE

VIEW AND DOWNLOAD: Toledo Magazine Outdoors Page

 

Owens Corning's current lease on its headquarters building along the Maumee River expires in 2015, but officials said earlier this month that the company and the Bell administration have a tentative agreement on an incentive package to keep the company there until at least 2030.
Owens Corning's current lease on its headquarters building along the Maumee River expires in 2015, but officials said earlier this month that the company and the Bell administration have a tentative agreement on an incentive package to keep the company there until at least 2030.

3. A marriage of two companies, Owens Corning celebrates its 75th anniversary

In the mid-1930s, two giants of the glass industry were experimenting with a new product. Owens-Illinois Inc. and Corning Glass Works both saw potential in their development of glass textiles, but the market was small at the time and neither company was profiting from the work.

Instead of pressing ahead separately, the firms decided to collaborate, sharing equipment, personnel, and lab space.

What became Owens Corning was led by Harold Boeschenstein, a World War I second lieutenant from Edwardsville, Ill., who recognized the growing global nature of business. During his 29 years at the helm, annual sales grew from $4 million to hundreds of millions and by 1957 he was included in Forbes magazine’s list of 50 foremost business leaders. READ MORE

PHOTO GALLERY: Owens Corning celebrates 75 years 

Walleye goalie Mac Carruth (31) blocks a shot on goal during the second period.
Walleye goalie Mac Carruth (31) blocks a shot on goal during the second period.

4. Toledo scores twice in 3rd to down Wheeling 2-0 in home opener

A capacity crowd waited expectantly at the Huntington Center for the Walleye to fuel an already festive atmosphere in the home opener and Toledo did just that in the third period.

The 8,200 spectators at the downtown arena had to wait until the third period before either Toledo or Wheeling scored. Walleye rookie Kevin Lynch tallied the game's first goal 21 seconds into the final period as Toledo shutout Wheeling 2-0 Saturday night. READ MORE

PHOTO GALLERY: Toledo Walleye home opener  

 

 

 

 

Bedford senior Jeremy Harris (90), Lucas Mayo (21), Boss Brad (2), Alec Hullibarger (11), and Jack Maison (35) carry their teammate Colton Durbin's number three jersey off the field before the start of the match up between Monroe Jefferson and Bedford Friday.
Bedford senior Jeremy Harris (90), Lucas Mayo (21), Boss Brad (2), Alec Hullibarger (11), and Jack Maison (35) carry their teammate Colton Durbin's number three jersey off the field before the start of the match up between Monroe Jefferson and Bedford Friday.

5. Bedford student-athlete Colton Durbin mourned during football game

Outside of the visitors’ locker room at Jefferson High School, students, friends, family, and community members formed a massive human chain. Swathed in red, white, gray, and black, it seemed as if hundreds of people stretched from the school’s brick walls to the chain-link fence that surrounded the football field.

At first it felt like a typical Friday football night, but then the crowd hushed. The clicking of cleats against concrete grew steadily louder, and the Bedford football team began to file toward the stadium.

Colton Durbin’s family led the Kicking Mules onto the sanctuary of the lit playing field, a day after the youth died from injuries suffered in a car accident. READ MORE

PHOTO GALLERY: Mules honor Durbin in 49-0 win