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Published: Thursday, 4/4/2013

Inside Angles to show works of California painter

BY TAHREE LANE
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Little Fishes II, part of the exhibit coming to Inside Angles.        Little Fishes II, part of the exhibit coming to Inside Angles.
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Socko! The Thrill of Art, will open with a 6 to 8 p.m. public reception April 12 at Inside Angles Frame Shop and Gallery. Featured will be dozens of monotype and intaglio prints, and oil, acrylic, and watercolor paintings produced by the late San Francisco painter Carolyn Ellingson during a 30-year-period from the 1980s to her death in 2002. Ellingson’s work bursts with vigor and vulnerability, with bold colors and forms that are abstract but familiar. She had a flair for titling work, such as Pyromaniac’s Love Song with Charred Remains, Emancipated Eye, Optically Induced Event, Cyclamen Clouds Over a Crystalline Sea, Little Yellow Extravagance, Simultaneous Occurrences, Oingo, Boingo, Delicate Negotiations, and But Will It Match the Couch? Continuing through May 18, this is the first show since her death. See more of her work and read her biography at www.artgroove.com. Her sons, including Randy Ellingson of Toledo, curate the site. The gallery is at 6831 Angola Rd., Holland. Information: 419-867-3533 and www.insideangles.com.

Bernella A. Davison will speak about women in art at 2 p.m. April 13 in the Mott Branch Library, 1085 Dorr St. A retired art educator for Toledo Public Schools, Davison will speak to all ages about a variety of careers in art and successful women artists. Refreshments will be served. Davison, who lives in Florida, grew up in the neighborhood of the Mott library. Information: 419-259-5207

The Toledo Museum of Art has several events this week. Visiting glass artist Cappy Thompson from Seattle will speak Friday at 6 p.m. She is known for her reverse-painted vessels and will discuss her work and her week-long residency at the museum, which concludes Saturday. Meet Me at TMA, a program for people who have early-stage memory loss and their companions, will look at museum exhibits Saturday at 1:30 p.m. April 12 will be the opening of the Crossing Cultures exhibit featuring aboriginal art from Australia.

Area students ages 13 to 22 may submit their films to the second annual Lenawee Student Film Festival, which will be Sept. 21 during the Art-A-Licious festival in downtown Adrian. Any type of video can be entered, but must be suitable for children to watch.

Films will be screened in the historic Croswell Opera House. Competing for a $100 grand prize, entrants will be able to receive feedback from professional judges. Deadline is June 1. Submissions must be in DVD format and accompanied by an official entry form, available at artalicious.org/filmfestival. Mail entries to Art-A-Licious, P.O. Box 685, Adrian, MI 49221, or take them to the Adrian Public Library, 143 E. Maumee St., during library hours. Information: Ann.Knisel@lisd.us and 517-264-9840.

Spring in Clay and Ribbon, featuring work by sisters Mary and Kathleen Dennis, will be at Akimbo Gallery, 175 N. Main Street, Bowling Green, beginning with a 5 to 8 p.m. reception Friday in conjunction with the First Friday Gallery Hop. Ceramics by Mary and fiber art by Kathleen will be displayed through April 27. Information: 419-806-9116.

The Detroit Institute of Arts presents a mid-career retrospective of acclaimed Iranian-American artist Shirin Neshat Sunday through July 7. Neshat is known for her photography, films, and video installations that deal with gender, politics, and identity. This is the first major showing of her work in more than a decade. Three video installations follow three female characters: an aspiring political activist, a would-be mother, and a prostitute. Their stories are set against the social and political backdrop of Iran in the 1950s.

Neshat was born in Qazvin, Iran, in 1957 and came of age during a relatively progressive time in that country’s history for women and the arts. Shortly after she came to the United States to study, Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution brought a conservative regime to power. As restrictions on expression, dissent, and the activities of women increased in her homeland, Neshat explored the relationship between the personal and the political, the individual and the nation. She has spent most of her adult life in the United States. The show was organized by DIA staff. Neshat will have a conversation at 5:30 p.m. Sunday in the DIA with the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi, an Iranian lawyer, judge, and human rights activist, for which preregistration is highly recommended at fmca-dia.org. There is an admission to the museum at 5200 Woodward Ave. in Detroit. Information: www.dia.org and 313-833-7900.

Send items for News of Art two weeks before the event to tlane@theblade.com.



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