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Published: Thursday, 10/3/2013 - Updated: 1 year ago

Festivities open show of Japanese prints

BY TAHREE LANE
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Kawase Hasui's 'Takamatsu Castle,' 1921, is one of the Japanese  woodblock prints in the Fresh Impressions show at the Toledo Museum of Art.     Kawase Hasui's 'Takamatsu Castle,' 1921, is one of the Japanese woodblock prints in the Fresh Impressions show at the Toledo Museum of Art.
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Opening night for the Toledo Museum of Art’s Fresh Impressions: Early Modern Japanese Prints will be today from 7 to 9 p.m.. The exhibit of contemporary woodblock prints officially opens Friday and runs until Jan. 1. Opening night will include music, hands-on activities, and a cash bar. The Museum Café will be open until 8 p.m. for those who wish to purchase dinner. The Sho-jo-ji Japanese Dancers of Cleveland will perform at 6:30 and 8 p.m. in Libbey Court. Hands-on origami activity will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. in Gallery 1. A narrated Tea Ceremony presented in partnership with the Detroit Consulate General of Japan will take place at 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. in the Little Theater. The event is free and open to the public.

Rosemary Karuga's 'Wangu Wa Makeri' torn paper collage is part of a new show opening Friday evening at the Hudson Gallery in Sylvania. Rosemary Karuga's 'Wangu Wa Makeri' torn paper collage is part of a new show opening Friday evening at the Hudson Gallery in Sylvania.
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The exhibit will be in the Canaday Gallery and will feature 343 prints. Fresh Impressions stresses the importance of the early 20th-century resurgence of woodblock printmaking in Japan known as the shin hanga (“new prints”) movement. Information: toledomuseum.org.

● Africas: Contemporary Work from the Continent, will open with a 5 to 8 p.m. reception Saturday in the Hudson Gallery, 5645 N. Main St., Sylvania. It will feature a talk by Tunde Odunlade of Nigeria who makes prints and textile pieces, and art by Fred Mutebi, Jak Katarikawe, Sane Wadu, Rosemary Karuga, Ibou Ndoye, Tayo Denaike, and Stanley Agbontaen. Information: 419-885-8381 and scott@hudsongallery.

● The Arts Commission invites visual, literary, and performing artists to this evening’s Meet & Greet, 6 to 9 p.m. in the conference center at Toledo Botanical Garden, 5403 Elmer Dr. The event will include short presentations about Toledo’s Arts & Culture Community Planning Process and related topics, and a question-and-answer session with the Arts Commission staff. RSVP in advance to www.SurveyMonkey.com/​s/​MeetNGreetRSVP. Information: 419-254-2787 and TheArtsCommission.org/​Programs/​Meet-Greet.

● Paintings and drawings by Skot Horn and ceramics by Karen Roderick-Lingeman will be displayed at a show opening with a 6 to 11 p.m. reception Oct. 12 in the Secor Gallery, 425 Jefferson Ave. The show will continue through Nov. 9. Information: 419-514-7496 and rareparts33@yahoo.com.

● Call for artists: The Whitehouse Arts Advisory Board seeks artists and crafters for its annual Holiday FUNdraiser and Arts & Crafts Sale which generates money for community events. The event will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 7 at Hope United Methodist Church, 10610 Waterville St., Whitehouse. Table fee is $25 and participants are asked to donate an auction item. Information: 419-877-2804 and whitehouse.oh.art@gmail.com.

● The Findlay Art League's annual juried show invites people to submit work to the gallery, 117 W. Crawford St. in Findlay, 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 17 and 9 a.m. to noon Oct. 19. The show’s prospectus is at www.findlayartleague.com. Entries may be 2-D or 3-D, completed within the last four years, and not previously exhibited at an FAL show. Photography will be accepted. The show will open with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Nov. 1 in conjunction with the Arts Partnership’s ArtWalk, and will continue through Nov. 23. Information: 419-423-3724.

● Bowling Green artist Erwin Redl recently installed Meandering in eight stories of stairwells in the Borusan Contemporary, a museum on the Bosporus in Istanbul. The narrow stairwells are inundated with light from 254 computer-controlled RGB LED-panels, each 10-inches square, made of acrylic into which tiny lights have been placed. Their slow, glowing light sequences play off glass partitions, floors, and walls. “People sit on the stairs or walk up and down to watch the light change. It's the only light in the stairwell,” Redl said. “There of course were challenges: the sheer size required extremely careful electrical and mechanical engineering to realize my artistic vision. Thankfully the local team of technicians was quite accomplished and accommodating to the needs of the artwork.”

Redl, a native of Austria, is at work on a large suspended piece to be installed in a seven-story atrium at the new, $1.5 billion New York Police academy in Queens. To see Redl’s work, go to paramedia.net.

Send items for News of Art two weeks before the event to tlane@theblade.com.



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