Wednesday, Jan 17, 2018
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Art

WEEKENDER I NEWS OF ARTS

Detroit Institute puts new pieces on display

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    ‘Vase' from about 1900 is one of the recent acquisitions at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

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    ‘Saint Benedict of Palermo’ from about 1770 to 1780 is one of the recent acquisitions at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

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‘Vase' from about 1900 is one of the recent acquisitions at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

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Art lover’s road trip!

Heading into 2018, there are other great art exhibits to explore at Ohio and Michigan museums:

The Detroit Institute of Arts is opening a rotating exhibition space in January for the museum’s new acquisitions.

Out of the Crate: New Gifts & Purchases will feature seven pieces in the first installation, which opens Jan. 12 at the institution, 5200 Woodward Ave.

An interesting aspect of the gallery will be the information on the museum’s acquisition process, including the research and provenance of each piece.

“This gallery offers a transparent look at the DIA’s collecting process and policies while giving visitors a first look at both recent purchases and gifts,” DIA director Salvador Salort-Pons said in a news release.

Salort-Pons chose the pieces for the first installation, including the museum purchase Saint Benedict of Palermo (1770-80), attributed to Juan Pascual de Mena, coniferous wood, pigment and gold, and Vase, about 1900, slip-cast ceramic with eosin glazes, by Lajos Mack, a gift.

The first installation will be on view for about six months and then switched out with new acquisitions.

For more information, go to dia.org, or call 313-833-7900.

■ The Dayton Art Institute kicks off its 2018 exhibit schedule with a show that features large-scale contemporary origami works.

Above the Fold: Contemporary Expressions in Origami will open Feb. 17 and run through May 13. Above the Fold is a traveling exhibit of large sculptural pieces from nine international artists. The show was organized by International Arts & Artists in Washington.

For more information, go to daytonartinstitute.org, or call 937-223-4278.

■ The Taft Museum of Art in Cincinnati has an interesting upcoming exhibition that will feature 30 years of stained glass work by Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection is a traveling exhibition that shows off the many stained glass windows, vases, patterned lamps, furniture, and metalwork Tiffany created during his design career.

The Cincinnati museum will display more than 60 pieces from the Richard H. Driehaus Museum private collection from Feb. 17 through May 27, before the show goes on a national tour until 2021.

For more information on the Taft Museum of Art or the Tiffany show, go to taftmuseum.org.

■ The Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St., again hosts its annual celebration of the Lego as an artistic medium with Think Outside the Brick, a collaborative show with the Ohio Lego User’s Group.

Included in the show is a large Lego model of Columbus that grows every year and Lego holiday decorations.

The show is open through March 2. For more information, go to columbusmuseum.org/art or call the museum at 614-221-6801.

■ The Cleveland Museum of Art is one of more than a dozen museums marking the 100-year anniversary of sculptor Auguste Rodin’s death with a display of his work.

The museum is featuring more than 40 pieces by Rodin from its permanent collection, including a special version of the famous sculpture The Age of Bronze that Rodin sculpted for the museum. A trustee at the museum, Ralph King, began collecting Rodin’s work during World War I, while the museum was still under construction.

For more information, go to clevelandart.org or check out the Rodin centennial event at Rodin100.org.

■ Don’t forget about the show this winter in your own backyard.

Glorious Splendor: Treasures of Early Christian Art at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., will remain open through Feb. 18.

It is a 30-piece collection of late Roman jewelry and other luxury objects made from precious gems and stone, dating from 2nd century B.C. to 7th century A.D., and created during the transition from a pagan to Christian society.

For more information, go to toledomuseum.org, or call the museum at 419-255-8000.

Send news of art items at least two weeks in advance to rgedert@theblade.com or call 419-724-6075.

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