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Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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HomeA&EBooks
Published: Sunday, 3/29/2009

Spring books open new worlds for children

This is one in a series of monthly reviews of books for young people written by four area teachers of children s literature. Today s are by Barbara A. St. John, a retired Bowling Green State University professor of children s literature.

Spring books always seem so exciting they re filled with thrilling ideas and characters, and are alive with vibrant color. Enjoy these!

THE AMARANTH ENCHANTMENT.

By Julie Berry. Bloomsbury. $16.99.

Ages 10-14.

An orphaned girl, a wicked aunt, an evil p o l i t i c i a n , a charming thief, a beautiful witch, and a clever pet goat get together in this mysterious tale. Readers soon learn that nothing in Lucinda s life is as it seems. She must discover the truth to claim her inheritance and marry the prince. What role does the amaranth flower play?

An exciting story by a new author.

PRINCESS OF THE MIDNIGHT BALL.

By Jessica Day George. Bloomsbury. $16.99. Ages 12 and up.

The Twelve D a n c i n g Princesses, a well-known tale, becomes the basis for this delightful novel. The 12 beautiful princesses emerge as individuals who are destined to dance each night for the King Under Stone.

Unless the spell is broken, they will be forced to marry the king s sons. It is Galen, a soldier turned gardener, who breaks the enchantment and frees the ladies.

Magic abounds as Galen becomes a gallant hero.

HOMEGROWN HOUSE.

Written by Janet Wong. Illustrations by E.B. Lewis.

McElderry. $16.99. Ages 5-9.

T o d a y many children are forced to move to new houses in new neighborhoods.

They will understand the sadness of the child in this book as she leaves friends and familiar places. What she wants is a homegrown house fi lled with secrets and memories a house like her grandmother s.

E.B. Lewis watercolor illustrations capture the child s loneliness and the warmth and security she finds in her grandmother s house. A beautiful book!

RED SINGS FROM TREETOPS.

Written by Joyce Sidman.

Illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski. Houghton.

$16. Ages 8-12.

Poet Joyce S i d m a n c a p t u r e s the subtle changes in color which

occur as the seasons change. She encourages readers to use all their senses and to actively participate in the changes taking place in their world.

Join in the joys found in this interactive book come, be part of the dance. The illustrations capture movement as readers are swept through the year.

SAME DIFFERENCE.

Written by Siobhan Vivian.

Push\Scholastic. $17.99.

Ages 12 and up.

Emily and Meg have always been best friends.

But as their last year of high school approaches, the dynamics change. Emily decides to take art classes at a prestigious school in Philadelphia.

She meets students who are more interested in exploring their own potential than fitting in. As Emily begins to realize her own strengths, she also decides to examine her own path.

THE LION S SHARE.

Written and illustrated by Matthew McElligott. Walker.

$16.99. Ages 4-7.

M a t h has never been so m u c h f u n !

When the animals g a t h e r to celebrate lion s birthday, each animal takes half the cake he is given. Ant s piece is so tiny she cannot share it with lion. She promises to make lion a new cake all his own. Not to be outdone, the other animals all promise cakes, each one trying to outdo the others.

The elephant promises 256 peanut-butter pound cakes.

Little ones will love these obnoxious animals.

OUR CHILDREN CAN

SOAR. Written by Michelle Cook. Illustrated by 13 African-American artists.

Bloomsbury. $16.99. All ages.

This is a magnifi cent book.

With sparse text and eloquent illustrations, Cook pays homage to African-Americans who paved the way for the civil rights movement which helped pave the way for the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States. The illustrations are by 13 amazing artists who capture the struggle for equality. Don t miss this one.



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