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Published: Friday, 8/2/2013

'Whitey' Bulger won't testify, calls trial a sham

ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo filed in federal court documents in Boston by defense attorneys for James "Whitey" Bulger on Wednesday, July 31, 2013,  shows Bulger with an unidentified woman holding birds in an unknown location. The photo was among several that showed a softer side of Bulger, which prosecutors complained were an attempt to salvage his reputation. Bulger, 83, is charged in a racketeering indictment with playing a role in 19 killings and multiple extortions during the 1970s and ‘80s when he alleged led the Winter Hill Gang. (AP Photo/Federal Court Documents) This undated photo filed in federal court documents in Boston by defense attorneys for James "Whitey" Bulger on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, shows Bulger with an unidentified woman holding birds in an unknown location. The photo was among several that showed a softer side of Bulger, which prosecutors complained were an attempt to salvage his reputation. Bulger, 83, is charged in a racketeering indictment with playing a role in 19 killings and multiple extortions during the 1970s and ‘80s when he alleged led the Winter Hill Gang. (AP Photo/Federal Court Documents)
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BOSTON  — James “Whitey” Bulger revealed today that he wouldn’t be testifying in his own defense, but he said the decision was involuntary and that his racketeering trial was a “sham.”

Defense attorney J.W. Carney Jr. met with Bulger early today and returned to the courtroom to tell Judge Denise Casper that he had finished presenting witnesses.

Bulger then told the judge, without the jury present, that he had “involuntarily” decided not to testify.

“I feel that I’ve been choked off from having an opportunity to give an adequate defense,” he said. “As far as I’m concerned, I didn’t get a fair trial. This is a sham.”

He railed about the judge’s decision prohibiting his lawyers from using an immunity defense. Bulger has claimed he received immunity from a now-deceased federal prosecutor. Casper ruled before trial that that was not a legal defense to crimes including murder.

Family members of Bulger’s alleged murder victims looked dejected over his decision.

Bulger, 83, is on trial in a broad racketeering indictment that accuses him of participating in 19 murders in the 1970s and ‘80s as leader of the Winter Hill Gang. He has pleaded not guilty.

Bulger fled Boston in 1994. He was one of the nation’s most wanted fugitives until he was captured in Santa Monica, Calif., in 2011.

Earlier today, Carney said Bulger wants the $822,000 in cash seized from his Santa Monica apartment to go to relatives of victims who won monetary judgments in lawsuits but then saw those awards overturned by a federal appeals court because the statute of limitations had expired.

It appears that two families fall into that category: Relatives of Michael Donahue and Edward “Brian” Halloran. In 2011, the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld an earlier decision that ruled the two families didn’t file their lawsuits against the FBI in time.

Other victims’ families have had their lawsuits tossed before trial and some have won judgments against the government, but Carney specifically cited those whose judgments were thrown out by the 1st Circuit.

Bulger is accused of fatally shooting Halloran, a Bulger associate, and Donahue, an innocent bystander who had offered Halloran a ride home in May 1982.

Prosecutor Brian Kelly said it has always been the government’s intention to give Bulger’s seized assets to victims’ families, but he said he isn’t sure Bulger “can dictate which ones get” money.

If he’s convicted, Bulger would have to give up his assets anyway. It is routine for the government to seek forfeiture of assets acquired through illegal activities.



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