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Probe of Amish girls' abduction continues

N.Y. sheriff: Couple charged may have planned other abductions

  • Missing-Amish-Girls

    This image provided by the St. Lawrence County Sheriff's Office shows the booking photo of Stephan Howells II, 39, who was arraigned late Friday Aug. 15, 2014 on charges he intended to physically harm or sexually abuse two Amish sisters after abducting them from a roadside farm stand. (AP Photo/St. Lawrence County Sheriff)

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • Missing-Amish-Girls-1

    An Amish family rides along Route 812 in Heuvelton, N.Y., near the command center at the Heuvelton Volunteer Fire Department, Friday. The investigation continues into the abduction and return of two young Amish sisters who were selling vegetables at their family’s roadside stand.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • Missing-Amish-Girls-2

    This image provided by the St. Lawrence County Sheriff's Office shows the booking photo of Nicole Vaisey, 25, who was arraigned late Friday Aug. 15, 2014 on charges she intended to physically harm or sexually abuse two Amish sisters after abducting them from a roadside farm stand. (AP Photo/St. Lawrence County Sheriff)

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • Missing-Amish-Girls-3

    Stephan Howells II, 39, left, and Nicole Vaisey, 25.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • Missing-Amish-Girls-4

    St. Lawrence County Sheriff Kevin M. Wells briefs the media on Friday, Aug. 15, 2014 in Heuvelton, N.Y., on the investigation into the abduction of two Amish sisters from the family’s roadside vegetable stand on Wednesday, Aug. 13. Delia and Fannie Miller were taken early Wednesday evening from the stand near the family’s home but turned up unharmed the next evening at a house in Richville, N.Y., about 15 miles away. Authorities weren't releasing any details about what happened to the girls during their daylong disappearance. (AP Photo/Watertown Daily Times, Jason Hunter) SYRACUSE OUT

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missing-Amish-Girls-1

An Amish family rides along Route 812 in Heuvelton, N.Y., near the command center at the Heuvelton Volunteer Fire Department, Friday. The investigation continues into the abduction and return of two young Amish sisters who were selling vegetables at their family’s roadside stand.

ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge

CANTON, N.Y. — A couple accused of kidnapping two young Amish sisters were prowling for easy targets and may have also planned to abduct other children, a sheriff said today.

Stephen Howells Jr. and Nicole Vaisey, both of Hermon, were arrested Friday on charges they snatched the 7-year-old and 12-year-old girls from a roadside farm stand in front of their home near the Canadian border.

St. Lawrence County Sheriff Kevin Wells said at a news conference today that more charges may be filed and that investigators are looking into whether the pair had plotted or carried out other abductions.

“We felt that there was the definite potential that there was going to be other victims,” Wells said.

The sisters were abducted Wednesday from their family’s farm stand in Oswegatchie and were set free by their captors Thursday.

Howells and Vaisey were arraigned late Friday on charges of first-degree kidnapping with the intent to physically harm or sexually abuse the victims.

The sheriff said Howells, 39, and Vaisey, 25, “were targeting opportunities” and did not necessarily grab the girls because they were Amish.

“There was a lot of thought process that went into this,” Wells said. “They were looking for opportunities to victimize.”

The suspects are being held without bail and have a preliminary court appearance scheduled for Thursday.

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Stephan Howells II, 39, left, and Nicole Vaisey, 25.

ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge

Bradford Riendeau, a lawyer for Vaisey, said, “We’re going to be reviewing the available evidence.” He expects to speak with her in jail later today, he said.

There was no answer today at the offices of the St. Lawrence County Conflict Defender’s Office, which is representing Howells.

Wells said the girls were able to provide details to investigators about their time in captivity.

The Associated Press generally does not identify people who may be victims of sexual abuse.

The kidnappings Wednesday touched off a massive search in the family’s remote farming community.

The girls turned up safe about 24 hours later at the door of a house 15 miles from where they were taken.

Searchers had scoured the farming community of about 4,000 people, a hunt hampered by a lack of photos of the girls for authorities to circulate.

The Amish typically avoid modern technology, and the family had to work with an artist who spoke their language, a German dialect known as Pennsylvania Dutch, to produce a sketch of the older girl.

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