Loading…
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Current Weather
Loading Current Weather....
Published: Wednesday, 3/3/2004

Napoleon wins, Patrick Henry loses as levies score mixed results at polls

BY JENNIFER FEEHAN
BLADE STAFF WRITER

A plan to eliminate extracurricular activities and at least a dozen more jobs in the Napoleon school district apparently was enough to change voters minds about a new tax.

Voters handily approved a five-year, 7.9-mill operating levy yesterday.

In November, Napoleon residents defeated the same tax request prompting the school board to make $167,000 in cuts this semester and $1.56 million in additional, permanent cuts starting next school year.

School officials have said the district is looking at a $2.5 million deficit. The new levy will raise about $2.3 million a year.

Also in Henry County, Patrick Henry voters overwhelmingly defeated a five-year, 8.75-mill operating levy that district officials said was needed to operate the district at “status quo.”

In other school districts across northwest Ohio:

Arcadia voters split their decision on two ballot issues. Voters defeated a 1 percent income tax intended to raise $584,000 a year, but approved a four-year, 6.9-mill emergency operating levy that will generate $440,000 a year.

Officials at the Hancock County school district said both taxes were needed to offset income reductions resulting from both declining enrollment and reduced state subsidies.

Ayersville voters approved an 11.68-mill operating levy that will take the place of two existing levies. The new tax issue will be permanent, which school officials said will give the Defiance County district long-term financial stability.

• Voters in the Bellevue city school district defeated a 1.85-mill bond issue that would have raised $8.2 million over 28 years to add classrooms at Shumaker Elementary, build a band room at the high school, and perform other renovation work.

Firelands Local Schools near Sandusky failed in its third bid to approve a new tax. The five-year, 6.31-mill operating levy would have raised $1.3 million annually. Voters rejected two smaller tax requests in 2003.

Fostoria voters defeated a 9.63-mill operating levy that would have generated $2.1 million in the first year and $1.2 million in each of the next four years.

Hicksville voters agreed to pay a five-year, 0.75 percent income tax for operating expenses. Had the tax not passed, a third phase of cuts, including extracurricular activities and academic positions and programs, would have been enacted.

Huron voters defeated a five-year, 6.9-mill emergency operating levy intended to remove the district from the state s list of financially troubled schools. The levy would have generated $2.1 million a year. A smaller, 4.9-mill levy lost by just 70 votes in November.

• In Hancock and part of Wood County, McComb voters approved a 0.5 percent income tax intended to raise about $300,000 a year for five years. The same request was defeated last November.

• Voters in the Millcreek-West Unity Local Schools in Williams County approved a five-year, 5.2-mill emergency operating levy.

• Voters in the Perkins Local school district in Erie County rejected a 6.9-mill, permanent operating levy that would have raised $1.6 million a year.

Tiffin voters decided against what would have been the Seneca County school district s first income tax. The 0.75 percent tax would have raised about $2.6 million a year.

• In Fulton County, Wauseon voters overwhelmingly agreed to replace a 1-mill, five-year permanent improvement levy.

• In Paulding County, Wayne Trace voters defeated an additional 0.5-percent, five-year income tax that would have generated about $407,000 a year.



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.