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Published: Friday, 3/12/2010

ACORN agrees to leave Ohio

ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS - The community organizing group ACORN has agreed to give up its Ohio business license and not return under another name, as it has in other states, under a settlement struck with a libertarian center that sued it.

U.S. District Judge Herman Weber in Cincinnati signed off on the deal, which settles claims brought by the 1851 Center for Constitutional Law against ACORN's voter registration practices.

ACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, describes itself as an advocate for low-income and minority home buyers and residents.

It denied any wrongdoing in Ohio. Other terms of the deal are confidential.

The center alleged in a lawsuit filed in 2008 that ACORN's voter registration drives amounted to organized crime because the group turned in a pattern of fraudulent forms.

Center attorney Maurice Thompson said restricting ACORN's ability to support or enable other groups to "do what they do" was crucial to the deal, especially in a state he characterized as "ground zero" to their voter advocacy efforts.

"It carries a great deal of significance because, in the absence of that term, ACORN could simply have shut down but reopened the next day as WALNUT or CHESTNUT or whatever and done the exact same thing," Mr. Thompson said.

In other states, including New York and California, ACORN chapters have disbanded and resumed operations under new names.

In New York, where three ACORN employees were caught on video apparently advising a couple posing as a prostitute and her boyfriend to lie about her profession and launder her earnings, ACORN's local offices disbanded and resumed operations as New York Communities for Change.

Prosecutors said they found no criminal wrongdoing by the employees.

That video and a series of others filmed at ACORN offices across the country last year sparked a national scandal and helped drive the organization to near ruin.

ACORN spokesman Kevin Whelan said yesterday the group agreed to surrender its Ohio business license by June 1 and already has halted operations in the state.

"For reasons unrelated to the lawsuit, ACORN was winding up its staff operations in Ohio anyway," he said.

"So there was no practical reason for us to spend time and money litigating this suit further, even though it was baseless and intended to harass us."

Mr. Whelan said offshoot groups that have formed as new nonprofits may have help from former ACORN activists but are independent entities.

He said no such effort has taken place in Ohio.

"They're new corporations, incorporated with different boards that include some people that used to be involved with ACORN but also prominent community members from labor and public life," Mr. Whelan said.



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