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South Korean president congratulates Park on election win

Votes still being counted

  • South-Korea-Politics

    South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye of ruling Saenuri Party raises her arms during her presidential election campaign in Busan, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. South Korea's presidential election is scheduled on Dec. 19. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Lee Ji-eun) KOREA OUT

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  • APTOPIX-South-Korea-Election

    South Korean President Lee Myung-bak exits from a voting booth to cast his ballot in South Korea's presidential election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. South Koreans bundled in thick mufflers and parkas braved frigid weather Wednesday to choose between the liberal son of North Korean refugees and the conservative daughter of a late dictator. For all their differences, the presidential candidates hold similar views on the need to engage with Pyongyang and other issues. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, Pool)

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  • South-Korea-Politics-1

    Opposition Democratic United Party's Presidential Candidate Moon Jae-in receives a bouquet of flowers from a supporter during his campaign in Daegu, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. South Korea's presidential election is scheduled for Dec. 19. (AP Photo/Yonhap. Lee Jae-hyuck) KOREA OUT

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  • South-Kores-Election-1

    South Korean Confucian scholars, wearing traditional attire, prepare to cast their ballots in presidential election at a polling station in Nonsan, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. South Koreans bundled-up in thick mufflers and parkas braved frigid weather Wednesday to choose between the liberal son of North Korean refugees and the conservative daughter of a late dictator. (AP Photo/ Yonhap, Yang Yeong-seok) KOREA OUT

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  • South-Korea-Election

    South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye, center, of the ruling Saenuri Party speaks to the media after she cast her ballot for presidential election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. South Koreans bundled in thick mufflers and parkas braved frigid weather Wednesday to choose between the liberal son of North Korean refugees and the conservative daughter of a late dictator. For all their differences, the presidential candidates hold similar views on the need to engage with Pyongyang and other issues. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

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  • South-Korea-Election-1

    South Koreans wait in line to cast their votes for a presidential election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, today.

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  • South-Korea-Politics-2

    South Korean opposition Democratic United Party's presidential candidate Moon Jae-in and his wife Kim Jung-sook cast their votes for the presidential election at a local polling station in Busan, south of Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. South Koreans bundled in thick mufflers and parkas braved frigid weather Wednesday to choose between the liberal son of North Korean refugees and the conservative daughter of a late dictator. For all their differences, the presidential candidates hold similar views on the need to engage with Pyongyang and other issues. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Kim Hyun-tai) KOREA OUT

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  • South-Korea-Election-3

    South Koreans wait in line to cast their votes in a presidential election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Huge crowds turned out Wednesday to vote in the tight presidential race pitting the son of North Korean refugees against the conservative daughter of a late dictator. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Kim Ju-sung) KOREA OUT

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  • South-Korea-Election-4

    South Koreans wait in line to cast for their votes for presidential election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. South Koreans wrapped in mufflers and parkas braved frigid weather Wednesday to vote in a presidential election heading for a close finish between the two top candidates - the liberal son of North Korean refugees and the conservative daughter of a late dictator. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

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South-Korea-Election-1

South Koreans wait in line to cast their votes for a presidential election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, today.

ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge

SEOUL, South Korea — The office of South Korean President Lee Myung-bak has congratulated party colleague Park Geun-hye for winning the presidency, though officials are still counting votes in today's election.

The daughter of late dictator Park Chung-hee is taking on liberal Moon Jae-in in a close race.

Seoul's National Election Commission says 16 percent of the vote is uncounted.

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