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Published: Tuesday, 5/9/2006

Write it down, speed it up

By KEVIN DONLIN

CTW FEATURES

Got a difficult problem in your job search? Say, a lack of networking contacts? Or trouble answering interview questions? Well, you ve got company. Problems in a job search are as common as potholes in March. But have you ever written your problem down on a piece of paper?

I ll bet you haven t because when you write problems down you take an immediate, huge leap toward solving them. Think about it: Every great invention or solution, from the atomic bomb to the Xbox, was first worked out on paper.

Why not solve your employment problems the same way? Here s a three-step method that will help you do it.

1) START BY ASKING EMPOWERING QUESTIONS

Most folks put themselves behind the eight ball in their job search by asking questions that are depressing and non-motivational. Questions like, Why won t anyone give me a job? or How do I network when I don t know anyone? won t cut it.

Instead, start asking questions that motivate and inspire you.

Better questions to ask are:

* How could I give people a reason to call me with job leads?

* How did my 10 closest friends find their current jobs? How could I brainstorm with them and use their methods in my job hunt?

* What worked in my last job search? The job search before? How could I do that again?

Important: Ask questions that you yourself can solve. Never depend on the government, your school, parents, family or anyone else to do this for you. Once you give up responsibility for solving problems with your job search (or anything else), you become a prisoner of outside forces.

When you ask the right questions, however, you re halfway to the answer. So write down at least five empowering questions about your job search, right now. Now you re ready for step two.

2) BRAINSTORM AT LEAST 20 POSSIBLE ANSWERS

After you write down five good questions, circle the one question that looks most promising. You re going to use it to get hired faster.

Let s say you write the following question down atop a clean sheet of paper: How could I give people a reason to call me with job leads?

Write a number 1 below it. Write a possible answer next to that number. Then move on to number two, three and don t stop until you have at least 20 answers to your question.

Not 15 or 19, but 20 answers, or more.

There s a reason for this: Left to its own devices, your brain will pull a Homer Simpson after two minutes and try to talk you into going out for donuts or beer. Brains hate to think. Like bench pressing,thinking is strenuous work no matter how good it may be for you.

But don t let your head off the hook. Don t stop until you get 20 possible solutions. Brainstorm as if your career depended on the outcome. Because it does.

Now, most of your 20 answers won t be very good that s OK. Your best answer may come right after the most hare-brained. By forcing yourself to write out 20 answers, you re flushing the creative pipes while going deep into your subconscious mind to dredge up a winner. Don t knock it until you try it!

3) TAKE ACTION ON ONE SOLUTION

Choose the most promising from your list of 20 answers. Then, get started today to make it happen. No excuses.

Let s say the most actionable of your solutions is to throw a networking party where you can meet friends, family and acquaintances, and let them know about your job search. What do you need to do to make this party happen?

Well, you have to make the guest list, send invitations, get the food, etc., so write down all the sub-goals necessary for the party to be a success. Check each sub-goal off your list as you complete it. Before you know it, your networking party will be a reality.

After that, take the next most-promising solution from your list of 20 and make that one happen. Repeat until hired.

Here s why these three steps work when it comes to solving problems: clear thinking plus continuous action equals results.

If you re struggling to find a job, write down clear, empowering questions of your situation. Then, brainstorm at least 20 possible solutions and take action on the best one today. When you do, you ll be that much closer to getting the job you really want, faster.

No, go out and make your own luck!

Kevin Donlin, owner of Edina, Minn.-based Guaranteed Resume, frequently writes about best practices in job hunting. For more information, visit www.gresumes.com.

CTW Features



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