Wednesday, Sep 28, 2016
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Southview, Northview students rebuild shelter at Olander Park in Sylvania

Railings, siding included in project

  • Students-rebuild-shelter-at-Olander-2

    Support lumber is in place at the open-air structure as members of the construction technology class work. The original shelter was built by Sylvania students in 1967.

    THE BLADE/LISA DUTTON
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  • Students-rebuild-shelter-at-Olander

    Travis Slemp, a Southview senior, removes a beam to be replaced at the shelter house at Olander Park.

    THE BLADE/LISA DUTTON
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Students-rebuild-shelter-at-Olander

Travis Slemp, a Southview senior, removes a beam to be replaced at the shelter house at Olander Park.

THE BLADE/LISA DUTTON
Enlarge | Buy This Image

The sounds of power tools on the west side of Olander Park come from Southview High School construction technology students rebuilding the shelter house there.

The students, all seniors, are contributing their labor to spruce up the open-air structure. They're expected to finish in another week or two, depending on weather. The class includes Northview High School students as well.

The crew, supervised by Bob Johnson, the Sylvania district's construction technology teacher, is installing a new railing with balusters, replacing the support posts and siding, and "dressing it up," Mr. Johnson said.

Dave Woodcock, maintenance manager for the Olander Park System, said a commercial contractor would charge $12,000 to $15,000. With the students, the park system will pay about $4,000 for materials, he noted.

The original shelter was built by the Sylvania High School carpentry class in 1967. The plaque mounted at the shelter then has been preserved and will be reattached along with a new one crediting the restoration work.

The rebuilt shelter will complete what Olander director Gary Madrzykowski calls "the threesome on the west side of the park."

The other projects -- rebuilding the other shelter there in 2008 and rebuilding the Swim and Beach Building two years later -- also were done by construction technology students.

The students said they were happy to be outside and doing something productive.

Students-rebuild-shelter-at-Olander-2

Support lumber is in place at the open-air structure as members of the construction technology class work. The original shelter was built by Sylvania students in 1967.

THE BLADE/LISA DUTTON
Enlarge | Buy This Image

"I enjoy it," Travis Slemp, 18, said.

The construction class starts in the junior year. It meets for 90 to 120 minutes a day and covers the basics. Mr. Johnson said his students can move into an apprenticeship after graduation in fields including painting, plastering, plumbing, and masonry.

Mr. Slemp said his father taught him how to use power tools, but the class had sharpened his skills and given him an appreciation for safety.

"I've learned how to use tools better and take precautions," he explained.

Ed Fair, also 18, said he too profited from the class even though he was introduced to power tools at home, working with his father installing roofing and siding.

"I can cut more precisely," he explained.

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