Loading…
Saturday, September 20, 2014
Current Weather
Loading Current Weather....
HomeA&E
Published: Sunday, 6/10/2012 - Updated: 2 years ago

Auction of sharpshooter Annie Oakley items fetches nearly $520,000

ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

Annie Oakley, American sharpshooter and performer, is shown with a display of medals in this undated photo at an unknown location. Annie Oakley, American sharpshooter and performer, is shown with a display of medals in this undated photo at an unknown location.
ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge

McALLEN, Texas — A shotgun that once belonged to Western sharpshooter and entertainer Annie Oakley sold for more than $143,000 at an auction in Dallas on Sunday.

The trove of about 100 of the icon's items headlining Heritage Auctions' "Legends of the Wild West" event brought in nearly $520,000, according to the auction house.

The items included several guns, her Stetson hat, photographs and letters. Oakley's great-grandnieces put up the items and had inherited them from their mother, who died in 2009.

One of those descendants, Terrye Holcomb, said, overall, the auction's success left her with a positive feeling, but "there's a little bit of melancholy and sadness that goes with it."

The items had been passed down through generations. Holcomb remembers shooting the guns for target practice on Sunday mornings in California's Santa Monica Mountains and wearing Oakley's Stetson hat — which sold for $17,925 — for Halloween.

But Holcomb said seeing how excited some of the buyers were with their purchases made her feel good.

One man who flew in from Odessa to bid on one of two Marlin .22 caliber rifles — one sold for $71,700, the other for $83,650 — asked Holcomb and her sister, Tommye Tait, to sign his catalog after buying one of the rifles.

"He said his kids couldn't wait to shoot it," Holcomb said.

The sisters inherited the items from their mother, Billie Butler Serene, who died in 2009 at the age of 95.

Serene was raised by her grandparents, and her grandfather, William Butler, was the brother of Oakley's husband, Frank Butler, a marksman who became Oakley's manager. Oakley and Frank Butler frequently visited and Oakley taught Serene how to handle a gun.

Holcomb said she grew up hearing stories about Oakley without fully realizing her impact.

This is one of the shotguns that was up for auction Sunday. One shotgun owned and used by the sharpshooter and performer sold for $143,000. This is one of the shotguns that was up for auction Sunday. One shotgun owned and used by the sharpshooter and performer sold for $143,000.
HERITAGE AUCTIONS Enlarge

"I've not ceased being amazed by her enduring legacy," she said.

Oakley's Parker Brothers 12-gauge shotgun garnered the highest price, $143,400. Holcomb said she thought the shotgun's winning bid was placed by phone or via the Internet.

"Annie Oakley was arguably America's first female superstar, touring the US and the world in the late 1800s and early 20th century and demonstrating her legendary Wild West sharpshooting skills," Tom Slater, Director of Historical Auctions for Heritage, said in a prepared statement Sunday.

Oakley became famous for her marksmanship while traveling in Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. She died in 1926 at the age of 66.



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.

Related stories







Poll