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Published: Monday, 3/4/2013

Those who create art find peace, joy in creation

For some, it is sustenance

BY TAHREE LANE
BLADE STAFF WRITER

Making art nourishes the artist before it feeds the viewer.

“The arts help people achieve integration, coherence, and peace,” says Charlene Taylor, who teaches art therapy at Lourdes University.

The very act of creating pulls the mind toward possibilities, whether one paints, sculpts, invents, writes, makes music, bakes, carves, dances, knits, or plants a garden. “These are the avenues by which we learn, resolve, stay present in, and celebrate our life,” Taylor says.

When circumstances change because of illness, injury, or aging, we must find new ways of doing and being: no matter the situation, art provides a way to develop potential. She cites Helen Keller as inspiration for her belief in the power of art to heal.

Put another way, “art is a wound turned into light” (attributed to the late Georges Braque, French artist and sculptor).

The Blade spoke with four people for whom art has been both pleasure and sustenance.

PHOTO GALLERY: Slideshow of artists' work

Melissa Partin-Harding: ‘Memories’

Photography gives Melissa Partin-Harding another voice, one that can sing in major and minor keys. It helped articulate the experience of caring for her dying child. And when delicate Michaela was gone, precious images remained. READ MORE.

Dave Wisniewski: ‘I ... plow ahead’

Being blind is not the best attribute for a painter. “It makes it a bit more complicated,” says Dave Wisniewski of South Toledo. READ MORE.

Gary Hovey: ‘I adapt’

It takes longer to make the Hoveyware sculptures than it used to. Nevertheless, in the last two years, Gary Hovey has crafted some of his favorite pieces, such as the gorilla family, which entailed three months of welding thousands of pieces of stainless-steel flatware. If he didn’t have Parkinson’s disease, it would been done in a month. READ MORE.

Klaire Russell: ‘New Life’

Drowning in rough seas, Klaire Russell grabbed a lifebuoy and clung to it, swimming for the shallows. “It gave me a new life,” she says of art. In the last six years, it’s been her salvation. “I want to be the next Martha Stewart.” READ MORE.



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