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Thursday, December 25, 2014
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Published: Monday, 8/23/2004

Great fun at the Gatsby

Flappers and gangsters turned out for the Third Annual Gatsby Gala to benefit The Arthritis Foundation of Northwestern Ohio. A display of vintage automobiles dating from 1925 to 1931 set the scene at Toledo Country Club for the speakeasy affair.

ROARING GOOD TIMES: Jane Gensler and Michelle Thomas are all dressed up in 'Flapper' outfits for the Gatsby Gala, standing next to a Gatsby-era automobile. ROARING GOOD TIMES: Jane Gensler and Michelle Thomas are all dressed up in 'Flapper' outfits for the Gatsby Gala, standing next to a Gatsby-era automobile.
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The gin started to pour at 6 p.m., and several folks flashed in on time - if not early - to pose with the classic cars.

A fabulous dinner followed with plenty of time for browsing the silent auction filled with all kinds of loot.

The real interest for the moxie crowd of more than 200, was the famous Gatsby Casino, which opened its doors after the artfully displayed elegant cuisine.

Good sports were the celebrity dealers in their white shirts and red armbands who wheeled and dealed with the guys and dolls who were all dolled up for a great time.

Duds on the dudes included zoot suits, fedoras, and spats, and the dames wore fringed dresses accented by colorful boas and long-strands of pearls.

To assist the professionals from Columbus, celebrity dealers included Harry Barlos, country commissioner president; Bob Helmer, president of Lourdes College, and Wade Kapszukiewicz, city councilman.

For ready cash to play the games of chance, including poker, roulette, blackjack, or bet on the ponies, guests were given $5,000 in play money to start.

But if the players were down on their luck, they could get more dough from the ever-eager "bookies."

GANGSTA' WHEELS: Lisa Worthen and Paul DeRaedt 'go for a ride,' or at least pose in the back seat of a vintage auto at the Toledo Club. GANGSTA' WHEELS: Lisa Worthen and Paul DeRaedt 'go for a ride,' or at least pose in the back seat of a vintage auto at the Toledo Club.
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In the background, light jazz played, and some guests even cut the rug with a mean Charleston.

Markers were turned in for prizes, including the grand prize, which was a cruise and all the items to go with it.

The main man was Joe Luzar, who kept things clean, humming, and on target.

Among the board members who were present and accounted for were chairman Jennifer Thompson, Bob Sterling, Paul Simmons, Dennis Rife, Mark Miller, Jim Gant, Denise Niese, Alexis DeCola, Asha Barnes, George Goldberger, Dean Hountras, and Ruth Lewandowski, emeritus board member.

Proceeds from the Gatsby Gala support the foundation's programming including Tai Chi for Arthritis, warm-water aerobics, and Camp Busy-Bee, a tuition-free summer experience for children between 8 and 15 who have been diagnosed with one of the more than 120 forms of arthritis.

DEDICATION OF NOTE: Patrick Hylant and William McDevitt face the music at the dedication. DEDICATION OF NOTE: Patrick Hylant and William McDevitt face the music at the dedication.
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It was a Hylant kind of a week. Thursday was The Hylant Group building s dedication. Then, the Pollyball presented by members of the Hylant clan was Saturday. In between was one big reunion of family, friends, and business associates.

That towering 15-story, glass-and-steel structure at the corner of Madison and Michigan, best known as the L-O-F Building, was the hot spot Thursday as it was rededicated as the Hylant Building, and more than 500 community movers were there to celebrate.

The Hylant Group, a fourth-generation insurance agency, moved its world headquarters into the building to keep a presence downtown. The building, constructed in 1960, is also home to Pilkington PLC, owner of the former Libbey Owens Ford.

The festivities began with the Star Spangled Banner and ended with the debut of Fan Fare 811 Madison, by The Toledo Symphony Brass Quintet. Composer William McDevitt nodded his head in approval as The Hylant Group s flag was raised and the ceremonial ribbon was cut.

PLAY BALL: From left, are Dan Hylant, Jeanne Hylant-Schoen and Dick Schoen, and Sarah and Geof Tracy. PLAY BALL: From left, are Dan Hylant, Jeanne Hylant-Schoen and Dick Schoen, and Sarah and Geof Tracy.
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The Hylant Group shared its glory by recognizing five northwest Ohio crown jewels of with donations: The Toledo Zoo, the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, the Toledo Museum of Art, St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center, and St. Francis de Sales High School.

Then it was sip, sup, and see. The building has new lighting, new ceilings, and new art on the walls that show through the floor-to-ceiling glass windows. Also spectacular is chairman and CEO Pat Hylant s office with a vast view of the city.

Included in the program were Pat Hylant, Bill Buckley, president and CEO, and Richard Hylant, President, Toledo office. Mayor Jack Ford gave congratulations.

The fun continued Friday with a company picnic at International Park, in spite of the chilly and wet day.

Spiking, serving, and kicking up a little sand, the 13th Annual Pollyball was Saturday at International Park. The event was in memory of Polly Hylant Tracy, who died of cancer in 1990. Her parents were Jeanne Hylant Schoen and the late Bob Hylant; she was the wife of Geof Tracy, and mom to Rachel, 20, Lauren, 18, and Sarah Tracy, 16.

Each year, the volleyball tourney benefits The Victory Center, helping cancer victims and families. Volunteers, spectators, 56 teams of players, food and drink by Rosie s and Heidelberg Distributing contributed to the sunny fun. Jim White Toyota was the winner.

It was a last hurrah for Joey Kline Apgar, executive director, who estimates a net of nearly $45,000. She left the center for another position.

SPLASH ACT: Sara Hetrick, left, and Kassidy Conrad wait at Belmont Country Club. SPLASH ACT: Sara Hetrick, left, and Kassidy Conrad wait at Belmont Country Club.
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Swish, swish, swish. Gliding through the water with grace and style were several young people who participated in area clubs synchronized swimming teams. Synchronized swimming includes children of all ages and helps perfect their strokes, rhythm, and team spirit.

The grand finale of the swimming season is always a water ballet. For mystique, the shows are most always performed at night, when the spotlights rays dance on the water, making it sparkle. Side stroke, back stroke, legs in the air, young swimmers in costumes draw fans mainly amilies as they swim with finesse to popular tunes.

SPLASH DANCE: Girls, watched by proud parents, friends, and relatives, perform poolside for the audience at Toledo Country Club's water ballet. SPLASH DANCE: Girls, watched by proud parents, friends, and relatives, perform poolside for the audience at Toledo Country Club's water ballet.
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Both in and out of the water the show goes on as different groups of swimmers perform simple routines and others more perfected. Life guards get in on the act too.

All in all, it s a fun night for everyone, even those who swam on the unusually cold summer nights.

Belmont Country Club presented the 2004 Syncho Show Music Through the Years. The Waterful World of Disney was presented by Sylvania Country Club. The Toledo Country Club s water ballet was Rock the Juke Box.

Other clubs holding water ballets included Inverness Club, Highland Meadows, and Laurel Hills.

LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN: Diana Patton and John Jones help inspire youth. LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN: Diana Patton and John Jones help inspire youth.
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Who were all those young men and women in suits and ties that gathered at Owens Corning headquarters Thursday evening?

Young professionals at The Greater Toledo Urban League Inc. reception.

President Johnny Mickler described the league s mission this way: We need to get young people involved in the community by nurturing them along to feel part of the community. He said the league plans to do this through classes.

The reception was the brainchild of board member Deborah Barnett.

Reception chairman was John Jones and Diana Patton was co-chairman.

GOTTA REGATTA: Nancy and Vice Comm. Brent Schneider enjoy Maumee River Yacht Club's homecoming. GOTTA REGATTA: Nancy and Vice Comm. Brent Schneider enjoy Maumee River Yacht Club's homecoming.
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Rain or shine, fuel prices high or low, the boating community continues to be active. It s more fun to have a destination, so yacht clubs host weekend regattas and homecomings.

It s an excuse for a party and it s a way to entice clubs to visit each other s home turf. Maumee River Yacht Club always has their homecoming the first weekend in August. Bayview Yacht Club s homecoming was last weekend.

There s something every weekend, no matter what the price is at the pumps.



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