Loading…
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Current Weather
Loading Current Weather....
Published: Monday, 5/6/2013 - Updated: 1 year ago

Thousands of UT graduates embark on new beginnings

3,041 students were eligible for degrees during academic year

TAYLOR DUNGJEN
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Sarah Hess, center, celebrates receiving her diploma during Sunday’s commencement ceremony at the University of Toledo. With the end of the academic year, 3,041 students were eligible for degrees. Sarah Hess, center, celebrates receiving her diploma during Sunday’s commencement ceremony at the University of Toledo. With the end of the academic year, 3,041 students were eligible for degrees.
THE BLADE/AMY E. VOIGT Enlarge | Buy This Photo

For thousands of University of Toledo students, Sunday’s graduation was only the beginning.

About three years ago, Alysha Hill met Patrick Cook in a Shakespeare class. The two Toledoans, who graduated Sunday — she with a master’s degree in English, he with a bachelor’s degree, his second, in creative writing — will marry.

PHOTO GALLERY: University of Toledo graduation

“We are big book nerds,” said Miss Hill, 24, who has taught English composition at the university for two years and will continue with the new academic year.

Mr. Cook, 27, writes science-fiction and fantasy books and is looking to have his works published, Miss Hill said.

Their wedding at The Chalet at Oakshade Grove in Oregon is appropriately book-themed. For the past year, Miss Hill has crafted flowers out of book pages from 20 novels; their centerpieces will be stacks of books, she said.

With the end of the academic year at UT, 3,041 students were eligible for degrees.

Graduates shift their tassles during commencement ceremonies for the University of Toledo's College of Business and Innovation, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, College of Visual and Performing Arts, and College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences. Graduates shift their tassles during commencement ceremonies for the University of Toledo's College of Business and Innovation, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, College of Visual and Performing Arts, and College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.
THE BLADE/AMY E. VOIGT Enlarge | Buy This Photo

The university hosted two commencement ceremonies Sunday, each targeting specific colleges — the first with a keynote speech from Sandra Pianalto, the president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

Ms. Pianalto told the graduates and spectators in a packed Savage Arena that, although countless studies show that, on average, college graduates earn more money than nongraduates, the real value is in how the graduates use their degrees to improve their lives and the lives of others around them.

Ms. Pianalto, who emigrated with her parents from Italy when she was 5 years old, studied both at the University of Akron and George Washington University.

During the commencement speech, Ms. Pianalto offered her “rules of the road to success.”

The first, she said, is to “get comfortable with being uncomfortable.”

Immigrating to America was a good test of that for her family.

“Look for opportunities that take you outside of your comfort zone,” she said.

The second rule: “There is no substitute for hard work,” she said, reminding students that even the people who are the best in their field had to work for it.

Third, “know your strengths and your passions.”

Sandra Pianalto,  president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, gives the morning commencement address at UT.  Sandra Pianalto, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, gives the morning commencement address at UT.
THE BLADE/AMY E. VOIGT Enlarge | Buy This Photo

As a third-grade student, Ms. Pianalto helped her parents study for their citizenship tests, developing a passion for and interest in government. From then, she knew she wanted to someday work in Washington.

Not everyone has a lifelong plan, she said.

“It’s OK to not know what you want to do.”

She advised the graduates to first figure out what they are good at and then decide what they like to do.

“By playing to your strengths, you set yourself up for success,” she said.

Her fourth rule is simple: To get respect, you must give respect.

The afternoon commencement address was delivered by Jeffrey Wadsworth, president and chief executive officer of Battelle Memorial Institute, the world’s largest nonprofit research and development organization.

Abdurrahman Mustapha, 22, said graduation was “awesome. I've waited a long time for that.”

The Toledoan, who graduated cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in English, said he plans to attend law school in the fall, either at Florida State University or Howard University.

While he’s in law school, he said he will apply to medical school. It would only add on another three years, he said.

“It’s a long road,” Mr. Mustapha said.

Only the beginning.

Contact Taylor Dungjen at: tdungjen@theblade.com, or 419-724-6054, or on Twitter @taylordungjen.



Guidelines: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don't attack other readers personally, and keep your language decent. If a comment violates these standards or our privacy statement or visitor's agreement, click the "X" in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member. To find out more, please visit the FAQ.

Related stories