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Published: Monday, 9/10/2012

Eastwood's empty-chair: trouble for ‘Curve'?

ASSOCIATED PRESS
A week after Clint Eastwood's appearance before the Republican National Convention, mocking continues about the Hollywood veteran's peculiar, rambling conversation with an imaginary President Barack Obama in an empty chair, raising the question: Will his latest film also be playing to empty seats when it debuts later this month? A week after Clint Eastwood's appearance before the Republican National Convention, mocking continues about the Hollywood veteran's peculiar, rambling conversation with an imaginary President Barack Obama in an empty chair, raising the question: Will his latest film also be playing to empty seats when it debuts later this month?
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LOS ANGELES -- A week after Clint Eastwood's appearance before the Republican National Convention, mocking continues about the Hollywood veteran's peculiar, rambling conversation with an imaginary President Barack Obama in an empty chair, raising the question: Will his latest film also be playing to empty seats when it debuts later this month?

Eastwood's nearly 12-minute-long speech, partially directed to an invisible Obama, has fired up a social media meme that shows no signs of cooling. It includes jokey videos of the infamous seat hosting a press conference and a montage of empty chairs plopped into Eastwood film scenes. While such ridicule plays well online, it could prove disastrous at the box office when Trouble With the Curve opens nationwide Sept. 21. The film stars Eastwood as a past-his-prime baseball scout for the Atlanta Braves who's accompanied by his lawyer daughter, played by The Fighter actress Amy Adams, on a last-chance scouting trip to North Carolina.

"If you're a Clint Eastwood fan, my guess is you'll probably still go to see the movie," said S. Mark Young, co-author of The Mirror Effect: How Celebrity Narcissism is Seducing America and professor at the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. "If you're not, you might be very disappointed with what's become of Clint."

A Warner Bros. studio spokesman declined to comment if the film's marketing campaign would be tweaked in light of Eastwood's odd convention appearance.

Although he's been a Hollywood staple, Eastwood has never conformed to Hollywood standards. He's a flag-waving Republican, a fiscal conservative who takes left-leaning stands on social issues like gay marriage. He made waves with right-wingers earlier this year when he starred in a Super Bowl spot for Chrysler, a company that benefited from government support.

Clint Eastwood, right, and Amy Adams in a scene from "Trouble with the Curve." The film, about an aging and ailing baseball scout, will be released on Sept. 21. Clint Eastwood, right, and Amy Adams in a scene from "Trouble with the Curve." The film, about an aging and ailing baseball scout, will be released on Sept. 21.
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Despite the continued roasting of Eastwood's RNC shenanigans online, Young of USC said moviegoers are often extremely forgiving of such bizarre, broadcast-for-the-masses moments. He cited Tom Cruise as an example. Cruise still draws crowds to theaters even after he wildly jumped on Oprah Winfrey's couch and called Matt Lauer "glib" on the Today show.

"Unless someone has done something truly egregious, people are still going to go to the movies," said Young.

Moviegoers aren't the only audience Eastwood might have to worry about following his divisive speech supporting Mitt Romney. There's also left-leaning Hollywood. Eastwood's Trouble With the Curve performance has already been bandied about as an awards contender. Could his empty-chair act have undermined Eastwood's chances at capturing more Oscars?

"What he did is not going to help him, but it's certainly not going to harm him either," said Scott Feinberg, awards analyst and blogger for The Hollywood Reporter. "The fallout and embarrassment from what he did is probably punishment enough for Clint. Ultimately, I don't think his 11-minute speech can undo his 50-plus-year legacy in Hollywood."

"This may actually have the reverse effect and cause sympathy for him," said Tom O'Neil, editor of the awards site GoldDerby.com. "The Oscars are all about hugs -- who we love and who we don't in Hollywood. There was something endearing about him taking a chance up there and embracing his politics. It took guts. That's kinda what you expect from Dirty Harry."



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