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Published: Thursday, 4/4/2013 - Updated: 1 year ago

Step back in time Saturday in Maumee

BY JULIE NJAIM
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Re-enactors from Fort Meigs will be dressed in period uniforms to perform a musket-firing demonstration Saturday at the Maumee Branch Library and talk about the life of a War of 1812 soldier. Re-enactors from Fort Meigs will be dressed in period uniforms to perform a musket-firing demonstration Saturday at the Maumee Branch Library and talk about the life of a War of 1812 soldier.
ELIZABETH RAYMOND Enlarge

Muskets will be firing Saturday when the Maumee Branch Library hosts Remembering the War of 1812.

“The thought out there is if you want to see history and see what took place you have to travel somewhere. Well, this happened here,” said Dan Woodward, program director for Fort Meigs in Perrysburg.

“The Maumee Branch Library sits on the ground where some of the fighting took place on May 5, 1813. It was called Dudley’s Massacre. He was the colonel in charge of the troops subsequently massacred by Native American troops.” That day 650 of the 800 U.S. soldiers were killed, captured, or wounded, Woodward said.

Saturday’s event starts with author Donald Hickey who will discuss the “Forgotten Conflict: Why the War of 1812 Matters Today.” The professor at Wayne State College in Nebraska is best known for his books including The War of 1812 and A Forgotten Conflict.

Interpreters from the Fort Meigs 2nd U.S. Artillery will be dressed in period uniforms to perform a musket-firing demonstration and talk about the life of a War of 1812 soldier.

After the musket firing, an American Girl soiree will be held. The Caroline Abbott doll, whose story starts in 1812, will be on display. The party will include refreshments, making cornhusk dolls, and playing games. Girls are invited to bring their dolls to the party.

The War of 1812 is a significant part of our history often overshadowed by the American Revolution and the Civil War, Woodward said. ‘‘It was the first war we fought as a nation and it gave us some of the national symbols. It gave us concepts we still hold dear and continue to define our culture today. The greatest example of that is the ‘Star Spangled Banner’ that would ultimately become our national anthem. It was written in September, 1814, when the British attacked Fort McHenry near Baltimore.”

Remembering the War of 1812 will start at 11 a.m. Saturday with author Donald Hickey discussing “Forgotten Conflict: Why the War of 1812 Matters Today” at the Maumee Branch Library, 501 River Rd., Maumee. A musket-firing demonstration will take place at 12:30 p.m. The American Girl Soiree with Caroline Abbott will begin at 2 p.m. and reservations are required. The day’s events are free. Information: 419-259-5360 or toledolibrary.org.

Dark Comedy

ANN ARBOR — The University of Michigan Department of Theatre and Drama today will open the 2008 Pulitzer-Prize winning drama August: Osage County.

When the patriarch of the Weston family disappears, the rest of the family gathers in Osage County, Oklahoma. Skeletons are let out of closets and secrets are revealed as arguments and accusations fly among these complex and intertwined relatives. A post-performance discussion featuring members of the cast will be held after Friday’s 7:30 p.m. show.

This Tracy Letts drama opened on Broadway in December, 2007, and closed in June, 2009. It won five 2008 Tony Awards. Letts’ film adaptation is set to be released in November.

“August: Osage County” will open at 7:30 p.m. today in the Arthur Miller Theatre in Walgreen Drama Center on the University of Michigan North Campus, 1226 Murfin Ave., Ann Arbor. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday through April 13, 2 p.m. Sunday and April 14, and at 7:30 p.m. April 11. Tickets are $26 for adults and $10 for students with ID. Information: 734-764-2538.

Please send theater items at least two weeks in advance to jnjaim@theblade.com.



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