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Published: Friday, 11/3/2006

Libertarian seeking Ohio governor post makes Toledo stop

Bill Peirce says he does not expect to be elected, but sees himself as a forerunner of future libertarian governments. Bill Peirce says he does not expect to be elected, but sees himself as a forerunner of future libertarian governments.
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Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Bill Peirce yesterday criticized the two major parties' economic policies during a rally in downtown Toledo, saying the state needs the libertarian policies of smaller government and lower taxes.

"Their ideas are disastrous," Mr. Peirce said as he rallied in freezing wind during the evening rush hour at Summit and Cherry streets in downtown Toledo after a stop in Bellefontaine, Ohio, earlier in the day.

"The policy of trying to create jobs by having special government programs directing investment into particular areas is disastrous. That's what got France a 25 percent unemployment rate for the young people," he said.

"I propose to cut those expenditures, special favors to particular firms and industries and use that money to cut taxes generally, especially to small businesses, but to all business," Mr. Peirce said.

An emeritus professor of economics at Case Western Reserve University where he taught for 35 years, Mr. Peirce is an author of books on government expenditure, taxation, and energy economics.

This is his first and last political campaign, he said.

"If you believe the polls, I am not going to win. But part of the purpose [of running] was educational - to get the message across to the people," he said. "Fremont did not win in 1856, but Lincoln did in 1860. And I see myself as a forerunner of future libertarian governments."

Said Mr. Peirce when asked what he thinks of his rivals, Ted Strickland, a congressman from southeastern Ohio, and Ken Blackwell, the Republican secretary of state:

"Strickland, of course, hasn't said much of what he's expecting to do, except that his investment programs will be guided by committees of mayors and county commissioners. And Blackwell, if he sells the [Ohio] Turnpike as a planned state venture capital fund These are going to be strictly political. The decisions will be made politically and therefore will not be efficient. The state can't afford it."



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