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Dundee grows as Michigan declines

Village population up 12.4% in decade

Cabelas-dundee

Dundee anticipated growth with the opening of Cabela's in 1991. A recent survey shows the village's population has grown 12.4 percent since 2000.

The Blade/Andy Morrison
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DATA CHARTS: Scroll down to view all Michigan counties' population for 2010 and 2000 and the percentage of change, as well as the 20 most populous cities in Michigan, including population in 2010, 2000, numeric change and percentage change. CLICK HERE to search more Michigan Census data.

Call it the Cabela's effect.

When the giant outdoor retailer decided in 1999 to move into the sleepy, historic little village of Dundee, Mich., people anticipated growth.

They got it.

In addition to the offshoot development of shops and businesses near Dundee's U.S. 23 exit, the village population itself grew 12.4 percent from 2000 to 2010, to 3,957 residents in 2010 from 3,522 in 2000, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released by the federal government Tuesday.

"Cabela's put Dundee on the map," Patrick Burtch, Dundee's longtime administrator, told The Blade last August in what now appears to be an understatement.

Dundee's growth bucked the trend for most of Michigan, which lost population as a state.

The downtrodden southeast part of Michigan was hit especially hard. Detroit lost 25 percent of its population that decade.

Observers have attributed Michigan's overall decline largely to the state's longtime reliance on the auto industry, which recently has been showing promise after years of declining sales and countless layoffs.

Although Monroe County grew by 4.2 percent, the city of Monroe lost 6.1 percent of its population.

The Toledo-area suburbs of Temperance and Lambertville grew by 9.8 percent and 7 percent, respectively, though.

The city of Monroe's decline to 20,733 residents in 2010 from 22,076 in 2000 includes a 41 percent increase in its Hispanic population, to 860 from 610; a 14.6 percent increase in its African-American population, to 1,251 from 1,092; a 10 percent decrease in its white population, to 17,855 from 19,748, and a 9 percent decrease in youths 18 years of age and younger, to 5,435 from 5,941, records show.

Temperance grew to 8,517 residents from 7,757 over the same decade, and Lambertville's population went up to 9,953 from 9,299.

Hammered by the auto industry's slump, Detroit experienced a population drop to to 713,777 in 2010, compared with 951,270 in 2000.

Although a significant decrease was expected, state demographer Ken Darga said the number is "considerably lower" than the Census Bureau's estimate last year.

"That's just incredible," added Kurt Metzger, a demographer with Data Driven Detroit, a nonprofit organization that collects statistics used by area planners. "It's certainly the largest population loss percentage-wise that we've ever had in this city."

Mayor Dave Bing disputed the numbers, claiming his city has at least 750,000 residents, which he called an important threshold for qualifying for some state and federal financial programs.

He didn't say how so many people were missed by census workers, but he said he planned to appeal.

Detroit's population peaked at 1.8 million in 1950, when it ranked fifth nationally. The numbers reflect the steady decline of the auto industry -- the city's economic lifeblood for a century -- and an exodus of many residents to the suburbs.

"The census figures clearly show how crucial it is to reinvent Michigan," Gov. Rick Snyder said.

"It is time for all of us to realign our expectations so that they reflect today's realities."

Grand Rapids, Michigan's second-largest city, has traditionally had a more stable economy. But it also experienced a large loss. The government bureau listed its 2010 population at 188,040, a 4.9 percent drop.

The only city among Michigan's five largest to show a gain was Sterling Heights, which grew by 4.2 percent to 129,699 in 2010.

The statewide population fell 0.6 percent, to 9,883,640 in 2010 from 9,938,444 in 2000, although it did make gains with Hispanics and residents of Asian origin.

The non-Hispanic Asian population was 236,490, up 35 percent over the decade -- Michigan's fastest growing racial group.

Asians now account for 2.4 percent of the state's residents.

Michigan's Hispanic population grew by 34.7 percent, to 436,358 or 4.4 percent of the overall population. Also up slightly was the American Indian population, which rose 1.3 percent to 54,665.

Mr. Metzger said the drop-off in Detroit partially reflects the migration of middle-class blacks to suburban counties, a trend begun by whites decades ago.

But the numbers also show many blacks have given up on Michigan altogether: The state's non-Hispanic black population fell from 1,408,522 to 1,383,756, a 1.8 percent drop. That marks Michigan's first drop in black residents since statehood, and a historically significant change for a state that was long a magnet for blacks leaving the South to escape discrimination and seek jobs, said William Frey, a Brookings Institution demographer.

More recently, the housing crisis accelerated foreclosures and drove down prices, which Mr. Metzger said has enabled more black families to buy houses in the suburbs.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Contact Tom Henry at: thenry@theblade.com or 419-724-6079.

 

 CENSUS 2010
 
Populations, percent change for all Michigan counties

  State/Counties Total population 2010 Total population 2000 Percent change
  State of Michigan 9,883,640 9,938,444 -0.06
  Alcona County 10,942 11,719 -6.6
  Alger County 9,601 9,862 -2.6
  Allegan County 111,408 105,665 5.5
  Alpena County 29,598 31,314 -5.4
  Antrim County 23,580 23,110 2.1
  Arenac County 15,899 17,269 -8
  Baraga County 8,860 8,746 1.4
  Barry County 59,173 56,755 4.2
  Bay County 107,771 110,157 -2.3
  Benzie County 17,525 15,998 9.6
  Berrien County 156,813 162,453 -3.5
  Branch County 45,248 45,787 -1.2
  Calhoun County 136,146 137,985 -1.3
  Cass County 52,293 51,104 2.4
  Charlevoix County 25,949 26,090 -0.5
  Cheboygan County 26,152 26,448 -1
  Chippewa County 38,520 38,543 -0.1
  Clare County 30,926 31,252 -1.1
  Clinton County 75,382 64,753 16.5
  Crawford County 14,074 14,273 -1.1
  Delta County 37,069 38,520 -3.8
  Dickinson County 26,168 27,472 -4.8
  Eaton County 107,759 103,655 3.9
  Emmet County 32,694 31,437 4
  Genesee County 425,790 436,141 -2.4
  Gladwin County 25,692 26,023 -1.3
  Gogebic County 16,427 17,370 -5.5
  Grand Traverse County 86,986 77,654 12
  Gratiot County 42,476 42,285 0.4
  Hillsdale County 46,688 46,527 0.3
  Houghton County 36,628 36,016 1.7
  Huron County 33,118 36,079 -8.2
  Ingham County 280,895 279,320 0.5
  Ionia County 63,905 61,518 3.8
  Iosco County 25,887 27,339 -5.3
  Iron County 11,817 13,138 -10
  Isabella County 70,311 63,351 11
  Jackson County 160,248 158,422 1.2
  Kalamazoo County 250,331 238,603 4.9
  Kalkaska County 17,153 16,571 3.5
  Kent County 602,622 574,335 4.9
  Keweenaw County 2,156 2,301 -6.1
  Lake County 11,539 11,333 2.4
  Lapeer County 88,319 87,904 0.4
  Leelanau County 21,708 21,119 2.8
  Lenawee County 99,892 98,890 0.9
  Livingston County 180,967 156,951 15.3
  Luce County 6,631 7,024 -5.6
  Mackinac County 11,113 11,943 -6.9
  Macomb County 840,978 788,149 6.7
  Manistee County 24,733 24,527 1
  Marquette County 67,077 64,634 3.8
  Mason County 28,705 28,274 1.5
  Mecosta County 42,798 40,553 5.6
  Menominee County 24,029 25,326 -5.1
  Midland County 83,629 82,874 1
  Missaukee County 14,849 14,478 2.6
  Monroe County 152,021 145,945 4.2
  Montcalm County 63,342 61,266 3.4
  Montmorency County 9,765 10,315 -5.3
  Muskegon County 172,188 170,200 1.2
  Newaygo County 48,460 47,874 1.3
  Oakland County 1,202,362 1,194,156 0.7
  Oceana County 26,570 26,873 -1.1
  Ogemaw County 21,699 21,645 0.3
  Ontonagon County 6,780 7,818 -13.3
  Osceola County 23,528 23,197 1.4
  Oscoda County 8,640 9,418 -8.1
  Otsego County 24,164 23,301 3.7
  Ottawa County 263,801 238,314 10.6
  Presque Isle County 13,376 14,411 -7.2
  Roscommon County 24,449 25,469 -3.9
  Saginaw County 200,169 210,039 -4.7
  St. Clair County 163,040 164,235 -0.7
  Saint Joseph County 61,295 62,422 -1.8
  Sanilac County 43,114 44,547 -3.1
  Schoolcraft County 8,485 8,903 -4.7
  Shiawassee County 70,648 71,687 -1.5
  Tuscola County 55,729 58,266 -4.3
  Van Buren County 76,258 76,263 0
  Washtenaw County 344,791 322,895 6.8
  Wayne County 1,820,584 2,061,162 -11.7
  Wexford County 32,735 30,484 7.4

  SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau

 

   CENSUS 2010
   Michigan's 20 most populous cities

City 2010 2000 Numeric change Percent change
Detroit 713,777 951,270 -237,493 -25
Grand Rapids 188,040 197,800 -9,760 -4.9
Warren 134,056 138,247 -4,191 -3
Sterling Heights 129,699 124,471 5,228 4.2
Lansing 114,297 119,128 -4,831 -4.1
Ann Arbor 113,934 114,024 -90 -0.1
Flint 102,434 124,943 -22,509 -18
Dearborn 98,153 97,775 378 0.4
Livonia 96,942 100,545 -3,603 -3.6
Westland 84,094 86,602 -2,508 -2.9
Troy 80,980 80,959 21 0
Farmington Hills 79,740 82,111 -2,371 -2.9
Kalamazoo 74,262 77,145 -2,883 -3.7
Wyoming 72,125 69,368 2,757 4
Southfield 71,739 78,296 -6,557 -8.4
Rochester Hills 70,995 68,825 2,170 3.2
Taylor 63,131 65,868 -2,737 -4.2
St. Clair Shores 59,715 63,096 -3,381 -5.4
Pontiac 59,515 66,337 -6,822 -10.3
Dearborn Heights 57,774 58,264 -490 -0.8

 
    SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau

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